Chris Grundemann

Chris Grundemann

Internet Technologist, Author, and Speaker. All opinions are his and his alone
Joined on June 2, 2012 – United States
Total Post Views: 46,084

About

Chris Grundemann is a passionate Internet Technologist and a strong believer in the Internet's power to aid in the betterment of humankind. In his current role as Director of Deployment and Operationalization (DO) at the Internet Society Chris is focused on helping to get key Internet technologies, such as IPv6 and DNSSEC, deployed around the globe.

Chris has over a decade of experience as both a network engineer and architect designing, building, and operating large IP, Ethernet, and Wireless Ethernet networks. Prior to taking the "DO" helm, Chris was focused on technical leadership, innovation, and contributions to standards & specifications as CableLabs' Lead Architect of Advanced Network Technologies. While there Chris took over and successfully led their IPv6 deployment coordination efforts to conclusion, co-created and led development of the HIPnet™ home router architecture (which facilitates self-configuring multi-router home networks) from initial ideation through prototype demonstration, and won the coveted CableLabs 'Inventor of the Year' award for 2012 (he currently has 11 patents pending). Before that, Chris was responsible for setting forward looking architectures and leading technology development efforts at tw telecom inc. Chris has also worked as a Network Engineer for Virtela Communications and as the Manager of Network Systems and Operations at WavMax Broadband/Hometown Access.

In addition to his professional career, Chris has remained consistently engaged in the broader Internet community as well. Currently serving as Founding Chair of the US Colorado Chapter of the Internet Society, board member for the Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force (RMv6TF), elected member of the ARIN Advisory Council (AC), appointed member of the NANOG Program Committee (PC), and chair of the NANOG-BCOP efforts which he also co-founded. He has previously held positions with CEA, UPnP, and DLNA focused on IPv6 development.

Chris has written two books: Day One: Exploring IPv6 and Day One: Advanced IPv6 Configuration; as well as several IETF Internet Drafts, various industry papers, a CircleID blog, a personal weblog, and several other publications. Plus he is often sought out to present at conferences and NOGs around the world. His specialties include network design, protocol design, consensus building, technology evangelism, research and development (R&D), leading collaborative groups, communicating abstract ideas to diverse audiences and generally getting stuff done!

Chris is based in Denver, CO and can be reached via Twitter or Google+.

NOTE: All views contained here on this website are mine and mine alone, they in no way represent the views of any of my employers, colleagues, associates, friends, neighbors, pets or anyone else. In fact, they may not even represent my own opinions by the time you read them.

Except where otherwise noted, all postings by Chris Grundemann on CircleID are licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Featured Blogs

The IETF's *Other* Diversity Challenge

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the standards body for the Internet. It is the organization that publishes and maintains the standards describing the Internet Protocol (IP -- versions 4 and 6), and all directly related and supporting protocols, such as TCP, UDP, DNS (and DNSSEC), BGP, DHCP, NDP, the list goes on, and on... But how do they do that? How does the IETF produce documents, and ensure that they are high quality, relevant, and influential? more»

Human Network, Human Challenges

It has now been about eight months since I joined the Internet Society as the Director of Deployment & Operationalization and I still get asked on a fairly regular basis "what do you do?" Well, with ISOC's Chief Internet Technology Officer Leslie Daigle's recent departure, and with my time here having exceeded both my first 120 days and my first 6 months, this seems like the right moment to reflect on my brief tenure here so far and perhaps pontificate a bit on where we're going - and why. more»

Securing the Core

BGP. Border Gateway Protocol. The de-facto standard routing protocol of the Internet. The nervous system of the Internet. I don't think I can overstate the importance, the criticality of BGP to the operation of the modern Internet. BGP is the glue that holds the Internet together at its core. And like so many integral pieces of the Internet, it, too, is designed and built on the principle of trust... The folks who operate the individual networks that make up the Internet are generally interested in keeping the Internet operating, in keeping the packets flowing. And they do a great job, for the most part. more»

Removing Need at RIPE

I recently attended RIPE 66 where Tore Anderson presented his suggested policy change 2013-03, "No Need -- Post-Depletion Reality Adjustment and Cleanup." In his presentation, Tore suggested that this policy proposal was primarily aimed at removing the requirement to complete the form(s) used to document need. There was a significant amount of discussion around bureaucracy, convenience, and "liking" (or not) the process of demonstrating need. Laziness has never been a compelling argument for me and this is no exception. more»

The Future of Home Networking: A Problem Statement

I'm a network engineer, and like many engineers I often gravitate to the big projects; large networks with problems of scale and complexity in my case. However, I also consider myself a student of Occam's razor and often quote Antoine de Saint-ExupĂ©ry: "perfection is reached not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away." In this spirit of "less is more" I have recently become intrigued by the problems appearing in home networking. more»

IPv6 Subnetting - The Paradigm Shift

Almost every conversation I have with folks just learning about IPv6 goes about the same way; once I'm finally able to convince them that IPv6 is not going away and is needed in their network, the questions start. One of the most practical and essential early questions that needs to be asked (but often isn't) is "how do I lay out my IPv6 subnets?" The reason this is such an important question is that it's very easy to get IPv6 subnetting wrong by doing it like you do in IPv4. more»

Is IPv6 a Boon to Criminals and Foe to the FBI?

Declan McCullagh recently opined that the "FBI [and the] DEA warn [that] IPv6 could shield criminals from police." His post was picked-up relatively widely in the past few days, with the headlines adding more hyperbole along the way. So just how real is this threat? Let's take a look. more»

World IPv6 Launch: Now What?

World IPv6 Launch kicked off 6 June 2012 at 00:00 UTC. On this day, multitudes of website operators, network operators and home router vendors from all over the world have joined thousands of companies and millions of websites in permanently enabling the next generation Internet. They have done this by turning IPv6 support on by default in (at least some of) their products and services. This is a major milestone in the history of the Internet. more»

Topic Interests

Internet ProtocolIP AddressingIPv6WhoisSecurityPolicy & RegulationInternet GovernanceRegional RegistriesCybercrimeBroadbandAccess ProvidersData CenterTelecomCyberattackMultilinguismNet NeutralityMobileIPTV

Recent Comments

Removing Need at RIPE
Removing Need at RIPE
Removing Need at RIPE
Removing Need at RIPE
Removing Need at RIPE

Popular Posts

IPv6 Subnetting - The Paradigm Shift

Removing Need at RIPE

Is IPv6 a Boon to Criminals and Foe to the FBI?

The Future of Home Networking: A Problem Statement

World IPv6 Launch: Now What?