Internet Protocol

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Painting Ourselves Into a Corner with Path MTU Discovery

In Tony Li's article on path MTU discovery we see this text: "The next attempt to solve the MTU problem has been Packetization Layer Path MTU Discovery (PLPMTUD). Rather than depending on ICMP messaging, in this approach, the transport layer depends on packet loss to determine that the packet was too big for the network. Heuristics are used to differentiate between MTU problems and congestion. Obviously, this technique is only practical for protocols where the source can determine that there has been packet loss. Unidirectional, unacknowledged transfers, typically using UDP, would not be able to use this mechanism. To date, PLPMTUD hasn't demonstrated a significant improvement in the situation." Tony's article is (as usual) quite readable and useful, but my specific concern here is DNS... more»

The Open Internet?

I'm sure we've all heard about "the open Internet." The expression builds upon a rich pedigree of term "open" in various contexts. For example, "open government" is the governing doctrine which holds that citizens have the right to access the documents and proceedings of the government to allow for effective public oversight, a concept that appears to be able to trace its antecedents back to the age of enlightenment in 17th century Europe. more»

The IETF's *Other* Diversity Challenge

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the standards body for the Internet. It is the organization that publishes and maintains the standards describing the Internet Protocol (IP -- versions 4 and 6), and all directly related and supporting protocols, such as TCP, UDP, DNS (and DNSSEC), BGP, DHCP, NDP, the list goes on, and on... But how do they do that? How does the IETF produce documents, and ensure that they are high quality, relevant, and influential? more»

NANOG 61 - Impressions of Some Presentations

The recent NANOG 61 meeting was a pretty typical NANOG meeting, with a plenary stream, some interest group sessions, and an ARIN Public Policy session. The meeting attracted some 898 registered attendees, which was the biggest NANOG to date. No doubt the 70 registrations from Microsoft helped in this number, as the location for NANOG 61 was in Bellevue, Washington State, but even so the interest in NANOG continues to grow... more»

Happy World IPv6 Launchiversary! Two Years Of Remarkable IPv6 Growth

Happy Launchiversary! It's been two years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012, the day many major Internet Service Providers (ISPs), home networking equipment manufacturers, and web companies around the world started permanently enabling IPv6 for their products and services. In the last two years, participation and interest in IPv6 has only grown. Today nearly 250 network operators around the world are participating in World IPv6 Launch measurements, and we continue to see increased IPv6 deployment by network operators, websites, and home router vendors. more»

Telegeography's Submarine Cable Map Now Lets You Link to Specific Cables or Landing Points

Want to easily show people where a specific submarine cable goes? Or what cables terminate in a particular location? Last year I wrote about Telegeography's cool interactive submarine cable map and how useful it is to understand the submarine cable side of Internet infrastructure. In that article I mentioned how great it would be if you could get a link for a particular cable or location that you could pass along to other people. more»

Human Network, Human Challenges

It has now been about eight months since I joined the Internet Society as the Director of Deployment & Operationalization and I still get asked on a fairly regular basis "what do you do?" Well, with ISOC's Chief Internet Technology Officer Leslie Daigle's recent departure, and with my time here having exceeded both my first 120 days and my first 6 months, this seems like the right moment to reflect on my brief tenure here so far and perhaps pontificate a bit on where we're going - and why. more»

Summary Report Now Posted of W3C/IAB "Strengthening The Internet (STRINT)" Workshop

Given that I've written here about the original call for papers for the W3C/IAB "Strengthening The Internet Against Pervasive Monitoring (STRINT)" Workshop and then subsequently that the STRINT submitted papers were publicly available, I feel compelled to close the loop and note that a report about the STRINT workshop has been publicly published as an Internet-draft. more»

The Importance of IP Resource Planning in Government ICT Strategic Plans

It seems everywhere I turn, there's someone throwing around statistics for how the Internet and broadband will drive economic growth, create jobs, end world hunger and bring world peace (ok, maybe not the later). Sure enough, government officials are buying into that rhetoric and extending it in initiatives like national broadband strategies, cybercrime and cybersecurity plans as well as e-governance strategies. more»

"Bitcoin and Internet Payment Systems" - IETF 89 Technical Plenary (Live Video Stream Available)

Are you interested in learning more about Bitcoin, cybercurrencies and Internet payment systems? On Monday, March 3, 2014, at 5:50pm UTC (London, UK) the Technical Plenary of the 89th meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) will be streamed live. The presentations during the "technical topic" part of the plenary will include... more»

Papers Now Available Publicly for W3C/IAB "Strengthening the Internet" Workshop

Want to read a wide range of views on how to strengthen the security and privacy of the Internet? Interested to hear how some of the leaders of the open standards world think we can make the Internet more secure? As I wrote about previously here on CircleID, the W3C and the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) are jointly sponsoring a workshop on "Strengthening The Internet" (STRINT) on February 28 and March 1 in London just prior to the IETF 89 meeting happening all next week. more»

Designing Effective Regulation for IPv6 Adoption

So you are the IT regulator for a country and you are convinced that the shortage of IPv4 address space represents a threat to the development of the Internet in your country and you want to do something about it. Being that as regulator you don't really run the countries IP networks, what can you really do? I've heard many regulators in over 30 countries grapple with this problem. The purpose of this article is to think through some ideas to guide action on using (or not) regulation to drive IPv6 adoption. more»

Thinking Strategically About the Benefits of IPv6

In a recent blog post How to Sell IPv6 to Executives -- Guidance for Engineers, the feedback I got from mailing list discussions was that the case for IPv6 was more of mitigating risk than some inherent benefit of IPv6 itself. That is quite true depending on context. In this article, I will attempt to give more insight into the benefits of deploying IPv6. In a nutshell, viewed from the traditional lens of benefit as something we know and recognise based upon experience, IPv6 has little benefit apart from the large address space. more»

Securing the Core

BGP. Border Gateway Protocol. The de-facto standard routing protocol of the Internet. The nervous system of the Internet. I don't think I can overstate the importance, the criticality of BGP to the operation of the modern Internet. BGP is the glue that holds the Internet together at its core. And like so many integral pieces of the Internet, it, too, is designed and built on the principle of trust... The folks who operate the individual networks that make up the Internet are generally interested in keeping the Internet operating, in keeping the packets flowing. And they do a great job, for the most part. more»

How Do We Get More Network Operator Feedback Into IETF Standards? Please Take This Survey

How do we get more feedback from the operators of networks back into the standards process of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)? How do we help know whether the open standards being developed within the IETF reflect the operational realities of the networks into which those standards will be deployed? If we could get more network operators participating in the IETF standards process, would that result in better standards that are deployed faster? more»

News Briefs

Researcher Propose Faster, Safer Internet by Abandoning TCP/IP Protocol

IETF Reaches Broad Consensus to Upgrade Internet Security Protocols Amid Pervasive Surveillance

IETF Looking at Technical Changes to Raise the Bar for Monitoring

IETF Working on HTTP 2.0, Will be Based on Google's SPDY Protocol

Internet Society Releases Paper on "What Really Matters About the Internet"

Leading Global Standards Organizations Endorse 'OpenStand' Principles

Prof. Dave Farber on Where the Internet is Headed

Making the Web Faster: Google Working on Enhancing Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)

Packet Latency Big Issue in Internet-Based Applications,

IFTF Tribute to Paul Baran: Forecasted Online Shopping, News and Banking in 1971

Vinton Cerf Elected and Paul Vixie Re-elected to the ARIN Board of Trustees

Richard Clarke: Defend Against Cyberwar by Re-Architecting Networks, Not Buying More Technology

Politico Writes of Comcast's IPv6 Effort

Verizon Begins Testing IPv6 on FiOS Services

Web at Twice the Speed: Google Reveals Information on SPDY Project

IPv6 Key Part of Multi-Billion Dollar Smart Grid Projects

Root Scaling Study Report is Out

Annual Global IP Traffic Will Exceed Two-Third of a Zettabyte in 4 Years

Oracle Announces Agreement to Acquire Sun Microsystems

Steve Crocker on the 40th Anniversary of RFC #1

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