John Yunker

John Yunker

Author and consultant
Joined on December 19, 2006 – United States
Total Post Views: 76,075

About

John consults with many of the world’s leading multinational companies, providing web globalization training and benchmarking services. Over the years, he has authored a number of landmark reports on seb globalization and usability, including:

> The Web Globalization Report Card
> The Art of the Global Gateway
> The Savvy Client's Guide to Translation Agencies

In his other life, he devotes his time to animal rights causes, and is author of the novel The Tourist Trail.

Featured Blogs

How the NSA is Threatening the Future of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Others

When I read government arguments in defense of the NSA, an oft-repeated line was: We're not targeting Americans. We're targeting foreigners. Foreigners. I really dislike that word. And I'm sure companies like Apple, Google and Facebook do as well. Why? more»

The Next Internet Revolution Will Not Be in English

Imagine if, every time you wanted to visit a website, you were expected to type in letters from a foreign language, or worse, an entirely foreign script, such as Arabic, Cyrillic, or Chinese. For more than a billion people, this is how they experience the Internet today. The Internet was designed to be global, but it was not designed to be multilingual. For decades, this limitation was most evident in website and email addresses, which permitted only a small set of Latin characters. more»

India: One Country, Many Internationalized Domain Names

If you're interested in learning more about Internationalized Domain Names (IDNs), UNESCO and EURid recently released a report on the evolution and challenges of IDNs. It's a good read and it highlights some of the struggles that countries and registries face and taking IDNs mainstream. Though Russia has so far proven to be a major success story - with more than 800,000 IDN registrations so far (and counting) - most other IDNs are have a long ways to go yet. more»

The Dangers of Building a Brand on a Tenuous Country Code

About two years ago I wrote with concern about Bit.ly's use of Libya's country code. I noted that It's always important to keep in mind that a company can't "own" a domain the way it owns real estate. Now it appears that companies that have built brand names on Libya's country code are facing difficult times. more»

The Next Internet Revolution Will Not Be in English

This visual depicts about half of the currently approved internationalized domain names (IDNs), positioned over their respective regions. Notice the wide range of scripts over India and the wide range of Arabic domains. I left off the Latin country code equivalents (in, cn, th, sa, etc.) to illustrate what the Internet is going to look like (at a very high level) in the years ahead. more»

Gruber Gives Up On His IDN

Tech pundit John Gruber threw in the towel on his domain ✪df.ws. He writes: "What I didn't foresee was the tremendous amount of software out there that does not properly parse non-ASCII characters in URLs, particularly IDN domain names." more»

ICANN Approves IDNs for China, Taiwan, Thailand, Sri Lanka…

A few weeks back I asked Where is China's IDN? ICANN not only answered my question about China, but also about a host of additional countries (and territory) that had applied for fast-track IDNs. Here are the most recent IDN (string evaluation) approvals... more»

The World's Most Dangerous Country Code Top-Level Domains

If you want to know the world's most dangerous country code Top-Level Domains (ccTLDs), ask an anti-virus software company. McAfee has released its list of most dangerous country codes. Here are the top five... more»

The Chinese Domain Name Bubble Bursts

Nearly one year ago, I asked Will .CN become the next .COM? And perhaps I was right in more ways than one. Because now it appears that .CN is experiencing its very own .COM bust. Just a year ago Chinese domain registrations were booming, so quickly in fact that .CN had surpassed .DE to become the most-registered ccTLD. more»

Twitter and Web Globalization

ICANN recently launched its own Twitter feed. And since ICANN is a global organization, it launched more than one language feed -- one in English and one in Spanish... This is not the most scalable solution. And I'm not trying to pick on Twitter; the issue effects any multinational company or organization. For instance, let's say ICANN launches a Portuguese feed for Brazil. The address would have to read twitter.com/icann_pt_br. Similar challenges arise with French... more»

Per Capita, Netherlands Is the World's ccTLD Leader

The Netherlands, a country with just 16 million people, accounts for more than 3 million ccTLDs. That's an impressive ratio of people to domains -- one ccTLD per 5.3 people -- and it the highest ratio of any country with more than five million residents. Germany comes in a close second, with a ratio of roughly one ccTLD per 6.5 people... more»

Will .cn Become the New .com?

I recently came across a chart of the most popular top-level domains (TLDs), compiled by Stephane Van Gelder. Although I keep track of country code TLD registrations for the Country Codes of the World map (see also related CircleID post), Stephane tracks all domains, including .com, .net., etc. And when I saw it I got to thinking... more»

Topic Interests

Domain NamesTop-Level DomainsWebICANNCybercrimeRegistry ServicesCybersquattingSecurityMultilinguismDNSInternet GovernanceData CenterPrivacy

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Popular Posts

The World's Most Dangerous Country Code Top-Level Domains

The Next Internet Revolution Will Not Be in English

ICANN Approves IDNs for China, Taiwan, Thailand, Sri Lanka…

The Next Internet Revolution Will Not Be in English

Will .cn Become the New .com?