Olaf Kolkman

Olaf Kolkman

Chief Internet Technology Officer (CITO), Internet Society
Joined on April 16, 2015 – Netherlands
Total Post Views: 27,862

About

As Chief Internet Technology Officer for the Internet Society, Olaf has responsibility for leading the Internet Society's Strategic Technical activities, particularly as they pertain to issues and opportunities for enhancing the Internet's evolution.

Olaf has been actively involved with Internet technologies since his astronomy studies during the early nineties. Internet became his professional focus in 1996 when he joined the RIPE NCC to develop the first version of what has become a worldwide test-network. In 2007 he became the managing director of NLnet Labs. Under his responsibility NLnet Labs produced open-source products, performed research on technical issues with global impact, and contributed actively to the regional and global collaborative standard and governance bodies (e.g. ICANN, RIPE, IETF), and 'pushed the needle' on the development and deployment of DNSSEC.

Kolkman describes himself as an Internet generalist and evangineer, somebody with deep knowledge on some of the Internet's technical aspects who particularly enjoys bridging the technology-society-policy gaps.

Notable Accomplishments
Olaf Kolkman was chair of the DNS Extensions Working Group between 2003 and 2006. He was IAB member from 2006 to 2012 and was its chair between March 2007 and March 2011. Oversight Committee and the IETF Trust. He was Acting RFC Series Editor in 2011. He chairs the IAB's IANA Evolution Program, chairs the IETF Weirds working group, and is the IETF/ISOC representative on the European Multi-Stakeholder Platform on ICT Standardization. He is also a Trusted Community Representative in the context of the DNS Root-Signing ceremony, and a RIPE Arbiter. He was a member of the Panel on Global Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms.

Olaf Kolkman is based in the Netherlands, where he lives with his family.

Featured Blogs

It's Up to Each of Us: Why I WannaCry for Collaboration

WannaCry, or WannaCrypt, is one of the many names of the piece of ransomware that impacted the Internet last week, and will likely continue to make the rounds this week. There are a number of takeaways and lessons to learn from the far-reaching attack that we witnessed. Let me tie those to voluntary cooperation and collaboration which together represent the foundation for the Internet's development. more»

Data Breaches and You: ISOC Global Internet Report 2016 Explains Critical Steps You Need to Take Now

Data breaches are the oil spills of the digital economy. Over 429 million people were affected by reported data breaches in 2015 -- and that number is certain to grow even higher in 2016. These large-scale data breaches along with uncertainties about the use of our data, cybercrime, surveillance and other online threats are eroding trust on the Internet. more»

Trust Isn't Easy: Drawing an Agenda from Friday's DDoS Attack and the Internet of Things

Last week, millions of infected devices directed Internet traffic to DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack that took down major websites including Twitter, Amazon, Netflix, and more. In a recent blog post, security expert Bruce Schneier argued that "someone has been probing the defences of the companies that run critical pieces of the Internet". This attack seems to be part of that trend. This disruption begs the question: Can we trust the Internet? more»

Enough About Apple and Encryption: Let's Talk System Security

This week, the RightsCon Silicon Valley 2016 conference is taking place in San Francisco. Since the use of encryption in general and the Apple/FBI case in particular are likely to be debated, I want to share a perspective on system security. My phone as a system The Apple/FBI case resolves around a phone. Think of your own phone now. When I look at my own phone I have rather sensitive information on it. more»

Blocking and Filtering in Collaborative Security Context - A Reflection on RFC 7754

The other day, I planned to take my 15-year-old son to the movie theatre to see "Hateful Eight" in 70mm film format. The theatre would not allow him in. Under article 240a of the Dutch penal code, it is a felony to show a movie to a minor when that movie is rated 16 or above. Even though I think I am responsible for what my son gets to see, I understand that the rating agency put a 16-year stamp on this politically-incorrect-gun-slinging-gore-and-curse-intense-comedy feature. more»

Starting a New Conversation on Cybersecurity

The cybersecurity debate can be highly confusing at times. There is perhaps an analogy to be made between "Cybersecurity" and "The Economy". We all want to fix the economy but making progress is not an easy task. As soon as you are beyond that statement you notice that there is a lot of nuance. Issues like trust, influence, actors, and affectivity all come to play when you want to fix the Economy. The cybersecurity discourse has similar features. more»