Home / News I have a News Tip

Group of Engineers Have Created a Way to Detect Dangerous Objects in Baggage Using Public Wifi

Various target objects and bags/boxes in the experiment. Left Image: Fifteen objects in 3 categories, Right Image: Six different bags and boxes

Engineers from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), and Binghamton University, have published a study describing a technique with which public wifi can be used to identify in-baggage dangerous objects in public spaces that don't typically have affordable screening options. From the report:

The growing needs of public safety urgently require scalable and low-cost techniques on detecting dangerous objects (e.g., lethal weapons, homemade-bombs, explosive chemicals) hidden in baggage. Traditional baggage check involves either high manpower for manual examinations or expensive and specialized instruments, such as X-ray and CT. ... many public places (i.e., museums and schools) that lack of strict security check are exposed to high risk. In this work, we propose to utilize the finegrained channel state information (CSI) from off-the-shelf WiFi to detect suspicious objects that are suspected to be dangerous (i.e., defined as any metal and liquid object) without penetrating into the user's privacy through physically opening the baggage. Our suspicious object detection system significantly reduces the deployment cost and is easy to set up in public venues."

Follow CircleID on
Related topics: Networks, Wireless
SHARE THIS POST

If you are pressed for time ...

... this is for you. More and more professionals are choosing to publish critical posts on CircleID from all corners of the Internet industry. If you find it hard to keep up daily, consider subscribing to our weekly digest. We will provide you a convenient summary report once a week sent directly to your inbox. It's a quick and easy read.

I make a point of reading CircleID. There is no getting around the utility of knowing what thoughtful people are thinking and saying about our industry.

Vinton Cerf, Co-designer of the TCP/IP Protocols & the Architecture of the Internet

Share your comments

To post comments, please login or create an account.

Related

Topics

Domain Names

Sponsored byVerisign

New TLDs

Sponsored byAfilias

IP Addressing

Sponsored byAvenue4 LLC

Cybersecurity

Sponsored byVerisign

DNS Security

Sponsored byAfilias