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Jim Cowie

Chief Technology Officer, Co-founder of Renesys
Joined on December 4, 2008 – United States
Total Post Views: 61,229

About

Jim has more than 15 years entrepreneurial and software development experience in high performance computing, network modeling and simulation, web services, and security. Prior to founding Renesys, Jim was a principal at Cooperating Systems, a consulting services company that provided rapid software prototyping and technology planning for advanced research and development in academia and industry. Jim's fascination with the Internet's impact on security and collaboration dates back to 1995, when he authored the first web-based collaborative environment for cryptographic key factoring. Jim is the primary architect of SSFNet, the first open-source network simulation framework to support transparent parallelization and multiprocessor execution. Jim holds a B.S in computer science from Yale University.

Featured Blogs

How To Build A Cybernuke

The Internet infrastructure has been having a bad month. Not as bad as, say, the world's aviation infrastructure, but bad enough. First, Chinese Internet censorship leaked out to a few massively unlucky users of the I root server. Then China Telecom failed to filter someone who leaked thousands of hijacked routes to other people's networks through them, probably by accident. And then, inexplicably, Forbes went where no one had gone before... more»

The Proxy Fight for Iranian Democracy

If you put 65 million people in a locked room, they’re going to find all the exits pretty quickly, and maybe make a few of their own. In the case of Iran’s crippled-but-still-connected Internet, that means finding a continuous supply of proxy servers that allow continued access to unfiltered international web content like Twitter, Gmail, and the BBC... more»

Iran and the Internet: Uneasy Standoff

We've received enough interest about our previous notes on Iranian Internet connectivity that I wanted to give a brief update, and some reflections. In short: Iran is still on the Internet. As the crisis deepens, people are literally risking their lives by continuing to use the Internet for coordination and communication. more»

A Closer Look at Iran's State of Internet, Strange Transit Changes in Wake of Controversial Election

Many media sources have reported outages in Iranian mobile networks and Internet services in the wake of Friday's controversial elections. We took a look at the state of Iranian Internet transit, as seen in the aggregated global routing tables, and found that the story is not as clear-cut as has been reported. There's no question that something large happened in the Iranian telecom space, and that the timing aligns with the close of voting and the emerging controversy... more»

How a Resilient Society Defends Cyberspace

Seventy-five years ago today, on May 29th, 1934, Egyptian private radio stations fell silent, as the government shut them down in favor of a state monopoly on broadcast communication. Egyptian radio "hackers" (as we would style them today) had, over the course of about fifteen years, developed a burgeoning network of unofficial radio stations... It couldn't last. After two days of official radio silence, on May 31st, official state-sponsored radio stations (run by the Marconi company under special contract) began transmitting a clean slate of government-sanctioned programming, and the brief era of grass-roots Egyptian radio was over... more»

Fiber to the Home: Ideal Economic Stimulus?

This week, the headlines seem to be full of fresh doom and gloom for wireline carriers, who employ people in every congressional district across America. Sooner or later, someone is going to call for Congress to tap some of the hundreds of billions in 2009 economic stimulus to help the LECs through troubled times, save lots of jobs, and preserve the way we do business in our critical last-mile communications infrastructure. Is this wise? Is there a better way? more»

Topic Interests

Policy & RegulationAccess ProvidersBroadbandTelecomCybercrimeCyberattackCybersecurityNetworksCensorshipDDoSInternet GovernanceWeb

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Popular Posts

A Closer Look at Iran's State of Internet, Strange Transit Changes in Wake of Controversial Election

The Proxy Fight for Iranian Democracy

Fiber to the Home: Ideal Economic Stimulus?

How To Build A Cybernuke

How a Resilient Society Defends Cyberspace