Derek Morr

Derek Morr

Senior Systems Programmer, Pennsylvania State University
Joined on January 10, 2009 – United States
Total Post Views: 96,247

About

Derek is a Senior Systems Programmer in the Emerging Technologies group in central IT at the Pennslvania State University. He is currently working with several colleagues to further the University's IPv6 deployment.

Except where otherwise noted, all postings by Derek Morr on CircleID are licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Featured Blogs

The Central IPv4 Pool is Gone

Yesterday, the Asia-Pacific registry got the last two blocks in the central IPv4 pool. The IANA has been sitting on five /8s (one per regional registry), and these will be handed out (along with the fragments from the legacy class B space), one to each registry. The IANA IPv4 registry doesn't yet reflect this. more»

Thoughts on World IPv6 Day

As I'm sure you've heard by now, June 8, 2011 is World IPv6 Day. On that day, several major content providers will turn on IPv6 on their public-facing services for a 24-hour period and see what happens. For some time, there's been concern that turning on IPv6 on a web site's main URL would cause unacceptable levels of breakage. Nevertheless, forward-looking organizations realized that they needed to start deploying IPv6. more»

IPv6, Phone Numbers and Analogies

My local area code (814) is running out of phone numbers. When discussing IPv6 with non-technical folks, I frequently use the hypothetical scenario of running out of phone numbers as an analogy for IPv4 address depletion. The conversation usually goes like this: "Imagine if we were running out of phone numbers. One way of solving that problem would be to make them bigger. Instead of ten digits, what if we made then thirty digits? If we did that, how many other things would we have to change? Some mundane things like business cards, letterhead, and phone books. But also more substantial things..." more»

Verizon Mandates IPv6 Support for Next-Gen Cell Phones

Cell phone carriers have seen a huge growth in wireless data usage. The iPhone is selling like hotcakes, and its users generate large amounts of traffic. Not surprisingly, as cellular providers deploy faster network technologies, users generate even more data... more»

Thoughts on IPv6 Security, Take Two

A few months ago, I made a post about IPv6 security. I've caught some flak for saying that IPv6 isn't a security issue. I still stand by this position. This is not to say that you should ignore security considerations when deploying IPv6. All I claim is that deploying IPv6 in and of itself does not make an organization any more or less secure. This point was made by Dr. Joe St. Sauver, of the University of Oregon... more»

The Slow Mainstreaming of IPv6

Slowly, we’re making progress mainstreaming IPv6. I wanted to post on a few interesting developments. Late last month, Netflix got an IPv6 allocation from ARIN, and they’re advertising it in BGP... I look forward to the day I can stream movies to my Netflix set-top box over IPv6. more»

Why 2008 Was a Milestone Year for IPv6

The beginning of the year saw IPv6 added to the DNS root, closing a major hole for IPv6-only communication. In mid-year, the US federal government's IPv6 mandate came into effect, requiring all federal IP backbones to support IPv6. While the mandate didn't have anywhere near the effect that many had hoped for, it did spur many vendors to add IPv6 support to their products. The amount of observed IPv6 traffic increased considerably, but we still lack good data for how much IPv6 is being used. So, where were we at the end of 2008? more»

Topic Interests

IPv6IP AddressingInternet GovernanceNetworksCybersecurityTelecomMobile InternetAccess ProvidersWirelessBroadbandRegional RegistriesRegistry ServicesCybersquattingDomain NamesTop-Level DomainsDNS SecurityDNSICANN

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Popular Posts

Verizon Mandates IPv6 Support for Next-Gen Cell Phones

Why 2008 Was a Milestone Year for IPv6

The Slow Mainstreaming of IPv6

IPv6, Phone Numbers and Analogies

Thoughts on IPv6 Security, Take Two