Home / News

Most Spam Sites Linked to Just About 10 Domain Name Registrars

New research suggests that more than three quarters of all websites advertised through spam are clustered at just 10 domain name registrars. The data comes from millions of junk messages collected over the past year by Knujon ("no junk" spelled backwards and pronounced "new john"), an anti-spam outfit that works by convincing registrars to dismantle spam sites.

Knujon's co-founder Garth Bruen said the links in spam messages touting fake pharmacies, knock-off designer products, pirated software and phony lending institutions redirect users to a relatively minuscule subset of sites that are generally under the control of a small number of companies.

Read full story: The Washington Post

By CircleID Reporter – CircleID's internal staff reporting on news tips and developing stories. Do you have information the professional Internet community should be aware of? Contact us. Visit Page

CircleID Newsletter The Weekly Wrap

More and more professionals are choosing to publish critical posts on CircleID from all corners of the Internet industry. If you find it hard to keep up daily, consider subscribing to our weekly digest. We will provide you a convenient summary report once a week sent directly to your inbox. It's a quick and easy read.

I make a point of reading CircleID. There is no getting around the utility of knowing what thoughtful people are thinking and saying about our industry.

VINTON CERF
Co-designer of the TCP/IP Protocols & the Architecture of the Internet

Comments

Re: Most Spam Sites Linked to Just About 10 Domain Name Registrars By Garth Bruen  –  May 22, 2008 12:06 pm PDT

Consider the Spam Balloon: Knowing that a minority of companies control most of the sites advertised in spam helps put the junk email problem into better perspective. To illustrate this consider a typical spam campaign. The emails are generated by tens of thousands of malware compromised machines and networks on the Internet. They send millions of spam messages to millions of victims. Sounds like a big problem, right? Not exactly. Because the number of actual websites advertised in those millions of messages is rather small in comparison the derivative of a spam campaign is seriously reduced. Reducing the true size even further is the fact that these real websites are held by one or maybe two registrar companies per campaign. Imagine that a spam campaign is a balloon. A balloon is actually made of a very small amount of real material, it only appears bigger because it's full of hot air. The huge volume of sent spam messages is the hot air that pushes the boundaries the Internet's resources, making the problem look bigger than it is. However, the air only stays in the balloon because it is knotted at the bottom. The registrars are this knot.

Graphic here:
http://www.knujon.com/news.html#05202008

Add Your Comments

 To post your comments, please login or create an account.

Related

Topics

Brand Protection

Sponsored byAppdetex

Cybercrime

Sponsored byThreat Intelligence Platform

DNS Security

Sponsored byAfilias

Whois

Sponsored byWhoisXML API

Domain Names

Sponsored byVerisign

Cybersecurity

Sponsored byVerisign

New TLDs

Sponsored byAfilias