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Security Researcher Warned US Congress of Stuxnet Variants 10 Months Ago

Paul Roberts reporting in threatpost: "Stuxnet may have been super sophisticated cyber weapon deployed by state actors, but future generations of the malware will be available to run of the mill script kiddies, a noted expert on security and industrial control systems has warned in a letter to the U.S. Congress ten months ago. Ralph Langner, the UK-based security consultant, released a copy of a confidential letter addressed to a member of the U.S. House of Representatives."

Read full story: threatpost

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He is hardly the first, or the last person to have warned of the possible vulns and threats in SCADA Suresh Ramasubramanian  –  Jul 31, 2011 8:38 PM PDT

as the subject says.

possibly yet another illustration of the fact that nobody listens to warnings unless its much too late

Wired Article points to Stuxnet-like vulnerability of prison cell door locks Steve Goldstein  –  Aug 02, 2011 1:03 PM PDT

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/07/prison-plc-vulnerabilities/

Researchers Say Vulnerabilities Could Let Hackers Spring Prisoners From Cells
By Kim Zetter July 29, 2011

"Vulnerabilities in electronic systems that control prison doors could allow hackers or others to spring prisoners from their jail cells, according to researchers.

"Some of the same vulnerabilities that the Stuxnet superworm used to sabotage centrifuges at a nuclear plant in Iran exist in the country’s top high-security prisons, according to security consultant and engineer John Strauchs, who plans to discuss the issue and demonstrate an exploit against the systems at the DefCon hacker conference next week in Las Vegas. ... "

8< ...snip ... >8

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