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OpenDNS Possible Alternative to Spotty DNS Services

Paul Mockapetris, the inventor of DNS and chief scientist at secure DNS provider Nominum, said DNS is like the water of the Internet. In that analogy, OpenDNS is like bottled water. If you use it, you don't have to trust the local water, which may be polluted or diseased, Mockapetris said.

"Of course, you have to trust the OpenDNS folks, and I suspect they are looking forward to showing you advertising. So maybe it is more like Gatorade, and maybe they will fluoridate their DNS and add stuff that will kill your prized fish in the aquarium as well as the phish they are looking for," he said. more

Google Warns With Anti-Trust Complaints for Net Neutrality

Google warns it will not hesitate to file anti-trust complaints in the United States if high-speed Internet providers abuse the market power they could receive from U.S. legislators... If the legislators ... insist on neutrality, we will be happy. If they do not put it in, we will be less happy but then we will have to wait and see whether or not there actually is any abuse," Vint Cerf, a Google vice-president and one of the pioneers of the Internet, told a news conference in Bulgaria. more

U.S. Invites Comments on ICANN's Future

A branch of the U.S. Commerce Department is accepting comments on the fate of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization that supervises Internet domain names.

The deadline for comments is Friday, according to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), which began soliciting input June 7.  more

ICANN Settles Feud with UK ccTLD Operator

The company that manages the U.K.'s top-level domain has struck a truce with the U.S.-based organization responsible for overseeing Internet domain names, cooling ongoing disagreements over administrative control of the Internet.

On Friday, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced at a conference in Marrakech, Morocco, that it had exchanged letters with Nominet UK, a sign of future cooperation on managing the name and number system that makes Web browsing possible. more

Nominet Signs Up to ICANN

In a hugely significant move, .uk registry Nominet has signed up to internet overseeing organisation ICANN and put to bed a historic battle between the US not-for-profit company and managers of country-specific internet domains.

The decision to go through with an "exchange of letters" where ICANN recognises Nominet as the owner of the .uk registry and Nominet recognises ICANN as the global technical body of the internet follows a decision by the ICANN Board to give ccTLDs greater autonomy within ICANN. more

Paul Twomey's Term Extended by 3 Years as ICANN President and CEO

The CEO of Internet overseeing body ICANN, Paul Twomey, has signed a three-year extension to his employment contract, it was announced this morning in Marrakech.

Speaking at the opening ceremony of the tri-annual ICANN meeting in Morocco, father of the Internet Vint Cerf surprised the international crowd by saying Twomey has been "re-enlisted" for another two years and had an option of another year. Most Internet observers had expected Twomey to stand down some time next year. more

IPv6, Google and Its Dark Fiber Mystery

The market is still guessing about Google's continued purchases of "dark fiber" and what that will mean to the Internet. Yet another explanation was floated at a recent IT conference: IPv6, the next-generation Internet standard.

During a debate on the adoption of Internet Protocol Version 6 at the Burton Group's annual Catalyst conference in San Francisco, Alex Lightman, CEO of IP telephony vendor Innofone.com, offered a new reason for Google's expenditures on dark fiber. His observation came during a dialogue on Internet addressing and the lack of support by service providers for IPv6. He is worried that the United States is focused on the present and is not addressing future needs. more

ICANN's Marrakech Meeting Starting This Week

There will be much to discuss at ICANN's Marrakech meeting which kicks off this Saturday, but one question rises about all others: what will happen to the internet on 30 September 2006?

ICANN has its own agenda to discuss, but that agenda and what people actually want to discuss are a little different. As is the fundamental issue that everyone at that meeting should be talking about. This is our account of what is likely to happen, why, and what it all means. more

ICANN Must Clamp Down On Domain Name Abuse

While Congress continues to consider the merits of so-called Net neutrality, an even more soporific but vital Internet legal issue looms, with ramifications for every business online and every user of the World Wide Web: What is the purpose of the database that contains information on every domain name registrant?

This question is being quietly debated by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) -- the Net's keeper of the all-important addressing system -- which is meeting June 26-30 in Marrakech, Morocco.

Today, cybersquatters have rebranded themselves as "domainers," says Doug Isenberg, the author of the article over at CNet News. more

IT Managers in U.S. Still in No Hurry to Adopt IPv6

Although the foundation of the next-generation Internet, IPv6, is gaining momentum in South Asia and receiving solid support in Windows Vista, enterprise IT managers based in the United States appear to be in little hurry to adopt the standard. Such was the conclusion of a debate held here on June 14 at the Burton Group's annual Catalyst conference. more

DNS to Be Eventually Replaced

If you created something that is used billions of times every day by millions of people, you might expect it to be around for a long time to come.

Yet Dr Paul Mockapetris, inventor of the net's Domain Name System (DNS), entertains few illusions about the longevity of his creation. "I expect the DNS to be eventually replaced," he told the BBC News website. "The internet is all perishable technology that going to get replaced or extended." more

Net Security an Oxymoron, Interview with SRI Principle Scientist

At a time when threats to the Internet and other computer networks loom from teenage hackers and terrorists alike, Neumann (pronounced "Noy-muhn") is sounding an alarm that computer security advocates agree has fallen on deaf ears. The trouble, Neumann warns, is that the Internet is populated by computers that were not designed with network security in mind. As a result, security is addressed on a patch-by-patch basis, but an effective solution would require redesigning systems from scratch. more

Security Experts Warn VoIP Attacks May Be Just Around the Corner

It's become a familiar pattern in online security. A groundbreaking way to communicate emerges, spreads like wildfire, and then hackers find a way to use it to their advantage. Security companies react--but not before the problem has succeeded in wreaking havoc. It happened with e-mail and is happening now with instant messaging and mobile devices.

The next area that could be targeted: Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, which lets people make low-priced phone calls using the same technology that delivers e-mail. And the results could be just as damaging, if not worse, than with other technologies, some security experts warn.  more

Venture-Backed Company Sets Focus on Direct Navigation, Using Over 650,000 Domain Names

A venture-backed Waltham company that's quietly amassed more than 650,000 Internet domain names is stepping out of stealth mode today and unveiling its plans to build a substantial Boston-area Web 2.0 business around the emerging field of "direct navigation."

The company, called NameMedia, is being led by Kelly P. Conlin , 46, a veteran media executive who previously had been chief executive of International Data Corp. in Boston and Primemedia Inc. in New York. NameMedia has already hired 75 people in its office near Route 128 to buy, sell, and develop businesses around Internet domain names. more

Domain Name Price Hikes Under Fire in a Congressional Hearing

A dispute over the cost of Internet domain names has spilled over onto Capitol Hill, where allegations of monopolization and unreasonable price hikes surfaced in a congressional hearing on Wednesday.

The dispute arises out of a lawsuit settlement reached on March 1 in which the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) gave VeriSign the right to raise fees on .com domains by 7 percent annually. The settlement, approved by ICANN's board by a 9-5 vote, ended a legal spat that started with VeriSign's controversial move to take control of all unassigned .com and .net domain names in 2003. Those guaranteed price hikes struck some members of the House of Representatives' Small Business Committee as unreasonable. more

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