Internet Protocol

Internet Protocol / News Briefs

IETF Reaches Broad Consensus to Upgrade Internet Security Protocols Amid Pervasive Surveillance

Internet security has been a primary focus this week for more than 1100 engineers and technologists from around the world gathered at the 88th meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Participants are rethinking approaches to security across a wide range of technical areas. more»

IETF Looking at Technical Changes to Raise the Bar for Monitoring

During a speech last week at the Internet Governance Forum in Bali, Jari Arkko, IETF's chair, re-emphasized it's efforts to ramp up online security in light of recent revelations of mass internet surveillance. "Perhaps the notion that internet is by default insecure needs to change," Arkko said. Significant technical fixes "just might be possible." more»

IETF Working on HTTP 2.0, Will be Based on Google's SPDY Protocol

With an eye toward updating the World Wide Web to better accommodate complex and bandwidth-hungry applications, the Internet Engineering Task Force has started work on the next generation of HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol), the underlying protocol for the Web. more»

Internet Society Releases Paper on "What Really Matters About the Internet"

Internet Society has released a paper today highlighting the importance of understanding what is important and unchanging about the Internet. more»

Leading Global Standards Organizations Endorse 'OpenStand' Principles

Five leading group of global organizations - IEEE, Internet Architecture Board (IAB), Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), Internet Society and World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) - today announced that they have signed a statement affirming the importance of a jointly developed set of principles establishing a modern paradigm for global, open standards. The group have invited other standards organizations, governments, corporations and technology innovators globally to endorse the principles. more»

Prof. Dave Farber on Where the Internet is Headed

"Internet protocols simply aren't adequate for the changes in hardware and network use that will come up in a decade or so," says Professor Dave Farber who was recently interviewed by Andy Oram. "Dave predicts that computers will be equipped with optical connections instead of pins for networking, and the volume of data transmitted will overwhelm routers, which at best have mixed optical/electrical switching," writes Oram.  more»

Making the Web Faster: Google Working on Enhancing Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)

As part of its efforts to speed up the delivery of web content, Google has proposed changes to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), "the workhorse of the Internet." Yuchung Cheng who works on the transport layer at Google wrties: "To deliver content effectively, Web browsers typically open several dozen parallel TCP connections ahead of making actual requests. This strategy overcomes inherent TCP limitations but results in high latency in many situations and is not scalable. Our research shows that the key to reducing latency is saving round trips. We’re experimenting with several improvements to TCP." more»

Packet Latency Big Issue in Internet-Based Applications,

Doug Madory reporting in Renesys Blog: "Packet latency is a big issue in Internet-based applications (i.e. the stuff in the cloud). In conducting analysis on Internet infrastructure over the years, we have seen many patterns of connectivity. One such pattern that can wreak havoc on latency is 'hair-pinning', a phenomenon where traffic takes an unnecessarily long physical path between two points on the Internet due to suboptimal routing. The increased distance results in increased latency, and the 'lag' or 'sluggishness' that users experience as a result can hinder latency-sensitive online applications whether they are financial trading applications or MS SharePoint." more»

IFTF Tribute to Paul Baran: Forecasted Online Shopping, News and Banking in 1971

With the recent passing of Paul Baran, IFTF is releasing an excerpt of a 1971 report in tribute, entitled "Brief descriptions of potential home information services." The excerpts are from the report titled, Toward a Study of Future Urban High-Capacity Telecommunications Systems, which included a handbook of forecasts for what was then called "broadband telecommunication and information services," later known as the Internet. more»

Vinton Cerf Elected and Paul Vixie Re-elected to the ARIN Board of Trustees

Vinton Cerf has been elected and Paul Vixie has been re-elected to the ARIN Board of Trustees. Each will serve a three-year term commencing 1 January 2011. The ARIN Board of Trustees congratulates Vinton and Paul. The Board thanks Aaron Hughes and Lee Howard for their participation as candidates in the election and encourages their continued participation in the ARIN community. The Board would also like to thank Lee Howard for his service and contributions during his tenure on the Board. more»

Richard Clarke: Defend Against Cyberwar by Re-Architecting Networks, Not Buying More Technology

In his keynote yesterday at the RSA Security Conference, former U.S. top chief counter-terrorism adviser, Richard A. Clarke, said cyberwar defence efforts need to focus on re-architecting networks not buying more technology. more»

Politico Writes of Comcast's IPv6 Effort

Larry Seltzer writes: Politico? Comcast's PR gets an 'A' for this article, an upbeat tech-lite description of the impending depletion of the IPv4 space and efforts to adopt IPv6. It also seems that the Obama administration is behind this, and that the Federal government has had "remarkable foresight on this issue." I feel better already. more»

Verizon Begins Testing IPv6 on FiOS Services

John Curran writes: Verizon has announced today that its "month-long trial of IPv6 involves FiOS-enabled customer homes with customized CPE -- provided by Verizon -- that can support both IPv6 and IPv4. The dual protocol setup will also be implemented on Verizon's edge gateway routers. Verizon employs 6PE technology, which uses IPv6-provider edge routers to connect across the company's IPv4 MPLS core. The IPv6 traffic is then sent over IPv6-capable peering connections." more»

Web at Twice the Speed: Google Reveals Information on SPDY Project

In a recent blog post, Google engineers have revealed information about an early stage project called SPDY (pronounced "SPeeDY"), aimed at significantly boosting Web download speeds. According to the post, SPDY is an application-layer based protocol designed for minimizing latency. It says: "So far we have only tested SPDY in lab conditions. The initial results are very encouraging: when we download the top 25 websites over simulated home network connections, we see a significant improvement in performance - pages loaded up to 55% faster. There is still a lot of work we need to do to evaluate the performance of SPDY in real-world conditions." more»

IPv6 Key Part of Multi-Billion Dollar Smart Grid Projects

Carolyn Duffy Marsan of Network World writes: "Could Smart Grid, the Obama Administration's effort to modernize the nation's electric grid, be the killer app for IPv6? That's what Internet engineers are asking as they see billions of dollars in stimulus funds pumped into smart electric meters, automated utility substations and new sensors networks -- all of which could take advantage of the abundant address space and built-in security offered by IPv6, the long-anticipated upgrade to the Internet's main communications protocol..." more»