Domain Names

Domain Names / News Briefs

Domain Name Registrations Increased by 30% in 2006

According to the Domain Name Industry Brief, released today by VeriSign for the fourth quarter of 2006, total domain name registrations reached 120 million, representing a 32 percent increase over the previous year, and an eight percent increase over the third quarter of 2006.

The domain name industry continued to experience strong growth in the fourth quarter of 2006, with more than 11.6 million new registered domain names. This figure represents a three percent increase year over year and a 23 percent increase from the third quarter. more»

ICANN to Sue RegisterFly, Locks At-Risk Down Domains

ICANN plans to sue scandal-hit domain name registrar Registerfly.com tomorrow, saying the company is putting its customers' estimated 2 million domain names at risk.

And in an unprecedented move, ICANN has persuaded the four major generic top-level domain registries to lock down all RegisterFly's customers' domains for a month, so they cannot expire and then be hijacked by speculators or domain traffic monetization firms. more»

ICANN Likely to Adopt New Whois Privacy Policy

Intellectual property lawyers guarding corporate trademarks on the Internet may soon have a harder time tracking down the people behind websites infringing on their clients' brands.

After several years of debate, this year ICANN is likely to decide on adopting a new policy that would let website owners keep most of their contact information confidential when they register for domain names. Instead, they would be allowed to list a separate go-between point of contact. more»

Chinese Registrar Refuses Sale of Gmail.cn to Google

Google Inc., fighting to consolidate its trademark globally, is facing an obstacle in the world's second largest Web market. China's www.Gmail.cn, which is refusing to sell its Internet address to the U.S. giant. According legal sources, Google was trying to buy the Internet domain name www.gmail.cn, which is run by Beijing-based ISM Technologies. more»

ICANN Threatens Registerfly to Clean Up

ICANN has given scandal-hit domain name registrar Registerfly.com 15 days to sort its problems out or risk losing its license to sell domains.

The organization, which oversees the domain name system's policies and practices, sent a letter with the ultimatum to New Jersey-based Registerfly yesterday, and published it on its own web site. more»

National Arbitration Forum Reports 21% Increase in 2006 Domain Name Filings

The National Arbitration Forum reports that their domain name disputes resolutions increased by 21% in 2006 compared to 2005. The National Arbitration Forum handled 1,658 Internet trademark disputes in 2006, making it the largest filing year since the inception of their domain name dispute program. more»

Fiasco Over ICANN-Accredited Domain Name Registrar Registerfly

Registerfly, an ICANN-accredited provider of internet hosting and domain name registration services based in New Jersey, controls approximately two million domain names for 900,000 different owners. Unfortunately for those whose domains seemingly are disappearing into the ether by the day, the company appears to be coming apart at the seams, with no resolution or government action in sight. more»

Entrepreneurs Profiting From Free Domains

It's not often you can compare Internet addresses with clothing, but a growing practice comes close, contributing to a global shortage in good names.

Entrepreneurs have been taking advantage of a five-day grace period to sample millions of domain names, keeping the relative few that might generate advertising revenues and dropping the rest before paying. It's akin to buying new clothes on a charge card only to return them for a full refund after wearing them to a big party. more»

Domain Name Prices Going Up This Year

The annual price of a .com or .net domain name will almost certainly rise this year, according to Stratton Sclavos, chief executive of VeriSign Inc, which runs the two namespaces.

The increases per-domain will be tiny in dollar terms, and will most obviously impact only those with very large domain name portfolios. But the aggregate positive impact for VeriSign will be substantial. more»

CNNIC Announces Support for Vista Chinese Domain Names

The China Internet Network Information Center has announced its full support for Microsoft's Vista individual operating system. Chinese users usually needed to input English-language characters on their browser's address column or email address column when they used Microsoft's operating systems, but with CNNIC's support and when using the new Vista operating system, users can input Chinese when they want to visit websites or send emails to servers that accept Chinese-language email addresses. more»

Are Domain Name Registrars Free-Speech Friendly?

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ICANN Gets Rid Of ".um" Top-Level Domain

The list of Internet domain names just got shorter. ICANN decided recently to yank ".um" -- for U.S. "minor outlying islands."

No one was using it anyhow, and the organization that has run ".um" -- the University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute - no longer wanted to bother. more»

Google's German Domain Name Briefly Hijacked

Visitors to the German Web site of Google were met with a strange sight early Tuesday morning: Gone was the Google logo, replaced by the name of a local Internet service provider with the message that no content was available for the domain. more»

EURid Tightens Control on .eu Domain Names

Under a new rule that will come into force next month, European registrars for the ".eu" domain will be able to immediately stop the transfer of ownership of a domain name if it's suspected of abuse.

The rule, set to take effect February 19, will make it easier for investigations into activities such as spam. more»

China Loses 10,000 Domain Names in Earthquake

Chinese Website operators have lost the use of their dot-com domain names due to telecom problems caused by last month's earthquake near Taiwan. The quake affected major international telecommunications lines causing thousands of dot-com domain names held by Chinese users to vanish from domain name registries. more»