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 IPv6 represents new territory for most Internet stakeholders, and its rollout will introduce some unique security challenges.

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Designing Secure Networks with Cisco Technology, Part 3

In this multipart series I will be presenting some of the leading industry-standard best practices for enterprise network security using Cisco technologies. Each article in the series will cover a different aspect of security technologies and designs and how each can be deployed in the enterprise to provide the best security posture at the lowest possible budgetary and administrative cost. In Part 2 of this series I discussed security risks and vulnerability. In this article we begin to focus on the role Cisco network and security technologies play in ensuring the safety and security of network data. more»

Verizon Tops US ISPs for Spam Abuse, Plans Prevention and Shift to Port 587

Brian Krebs of Washington Post reporting: "Verizon.net is home to more than twice as many spam-spewing zombies as any other major Internet service provider in the United States, according to an analysis of the most recent data from anti-spam outfit Spamhaus.org. Verizon, however, says it plans to put measures in place to prevent it from being used as a home to so many spammers. ... If spammers are attracted to the company's network, it may be because Verizon still allows customers to send e-mail on Port 25, the communications channel that is traditionally used by large organizations to send e-mail." more»

Malware Authors, Distributors Increasingly Using Social Netowrks

Security experts warn the "clickjacking" attack on Twitter service last week is part of growing trend of social engineering attacks via social networks. VP of security firm RSA, Sam Curry, calls the social networking attacks "orthogonal attacks." As users have become aware of phishing attacks and other efforts to get at their personal data, hackers have turned to social networks and "brand attacks," like the recent CNN.com-spoofing Cease-Fire Trojan to spread malware that goes after the same information once installed on the victim's computer. more»

Microsoft Offers $250K Reward for the Arrest of Conficker Computer Warm Authors

Microsoft is trying to put some pressure on the criminals responsible for the worst Internet worm outbreak in years, offering a $250,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Conficker's creators. The software vendor said it was also working with security researchers, domain name registrars and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to try to take down the servers that have been launching the Conficker attacks. ICANN is the nonprofit corporation that oversees Internet addresses. more»

F-Secure Third Security Vendor Attacked in One Week

A Romanian hacker site said on Wednesday it was able to breach the website of Helsinki-based security firm F-Secure just as it had gained access to the sites of two other security companies earlier in the week. F-Secure is "vulnerable to SQL Injection plus Cross Site Scripting," an entry on the HackersBlog site said. "Fortunately, F-Secure doesn't leak sensitive data, just some statistics regarding past virus activity." more»

An Economic Outlook on Information Security

As enterprise information security spending is scrutinized in unprecedented fashion in 2009 Information Technology management will seek to get more for their security dollar. While budgets tighten and risks grow due to the global economic downturn IT departments will be looking for point solutions, not suites of security tools. more»

U.S. Government Misses DNSSEC Deployment Deadline

The U.S. federal government has missed its initial deadline for rolling out DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) on its .gov top-level domain. Federal officials now say they will cryptographically sign .gov by the end of February, one month behind their original schedule. Federal agencies were required to deploy DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) on the .gov top-level domain by January 2009 and on all sub-domains by December 2009 under an Office of Management and Budget (OMB) mandate issued last year. more»

Designing Secure Networks with Cisco Technology, Part 2

In this multipart series I will be presenting some of the leading industry-standard best practices for enterprise network security using Cisco technologies... In Part 1 of this series, I provided an overview of the critical role that properly designed data security architectures play within an Internet-connected organization. Before we begin to discuss the security designs, processes and recommendations related to Cisco technology, let's first discuss some of the ways a network becomes unsecure... more»

DNS Amplification Variant Expected in Future Major DDoS Attacks, Experts Warn

Several sources are reporting about a new form of denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks which are based on a new variant of DNS amplification. DNS amplification was first widely publicized in March of 2006 with the release of a paper by security experts Gadi Evron and Randal Vaughn which examined a scenario in which criminals abuse recursive DNS name servers by using spoofed user datagram protocol (UDP) packets. more»

Data Breach Costs Continue to Rise, 40% Increase Since 2005

According to a new study by PGP Corporation and Ponemon Institute, data breach incidents cost U.S. companies $202 per compromised customer record in 2008, compared to $197 in 2007. The study is based on 43 organizations across 17 different industry sectors with a range of 4,200 to 113,000 records that were affected. It is also noted that since 2005, the cost component has grown by more than $64 on a per victim basis since -- nearly a 40% increase. more»

Malware Detection Declining, Anti-Phishing Filters Detect Less than 50% of Attacks, Says Report

A study comparing best-of-breed computer security vendors suggests more than half of active malware and phishing threats on the Internet go undetected, with an average detection rate of 37% for malware and 42% for phishing. "Given the dynamic nature of today's online threats and the traditionally reactive approach taken by today's malware and phishing detection technology, conventional signature-based solutions are inherently at a disadvantage to keep up," said Panos Anastassiadis, CEO and Chairman of Cyveillance. "Because the majority of damage occurs during the first 24 hours of an attack, early detection of attacks is crucial." more»

X-Force Report: Corporations Becoming No. 1 Security Threat to Their Own Customers

With the alarming increase in cyberattacks, criminals are literally turning businesses against their own customers in order to steal consumer's personal data, warns the latest annual X-Force Trend and Risk report from IBM. "The security industry puts a lot of effort into the technical evaluation of security threats, examining, sometimes at great length, the potential threat that each issue might present to corporations and consumers. Criminal attackers out for profit, however, have considerations that the security industry does not always take into account, such as monetization cost and overall profitability." more»

Designing Secure Networks with Cisco Technology, Part 1

In this multipart series I will be presenting some of the leading industry-standard best practices for enterprise network security using Cisco technologies.... "Wisdom consists in being able to distinguish among dangers and make a choice of the least harmful." That quote is quite possibly the most accurate depiction possible of the never-ending struggle between network security and corporate budget. Providing a mechanism to defend the enterprise network from every conceivable threat is impossible in terms of both technology and funding. more»

Google Flags Entire Web Unsafe, Glitch Due to Human Error According to Company

A glitch in Google's security update on Saturday morning caused links to every search result -- including Google's own pages -- to get flagged with the warning: "This site may harm your computer." The errors caused panic among users around the world who at first feared the popular search engine had suffered a major security failure. The problem which lasted for approximately 40 minutes has now been acknowledged and fixed by Google. The reason for the hiccup, as explained by Google, was due to a human error in the list of URLs Google uses to identify and flag websites known to install malicious software. more»

VoIP Security Predictions for 2009

Here are my VoIP and Voice security predictions for 2009, limited to just a few, key predictions... The poor economy will slow the adoption rate for VoIP and Unified Communications (UC). This will continue to limit the size of the enterprise VoIP deployments for potential hackers to exploit. VoIP/UC will continue to be mostly an internal/campus application where the threat level for attack is low, so deployments will be largely secured along the same lines as other data network applications. more»