IPv6 represents new territory for most Internet stakeholders, and its rollout will introduce some unique security challenges.

Security / Recently Commented

U.S. Now Leading Source of Attack Traffic, Followed by China and Russia

The U.S. became the top attack traffic source in the second quarter of 2010, accounting for 11% of observed attack traffic in total, reports Akamai in its State of the Internet Report released today. According to the report, China and Russia held the second and third place spots, accounting for just over 20% of observed attack traffic. Attack traffic from known mobile networks has been reported to be significantly more concentrated than overall observed attack traffic, with half of the observed mobile attacks coming from just three countries: Italy (25%), Brazil (18%) and Chile (7.5%). more»

The Worm and the Wiretap

According to recent news reports, the administration wants new laws to require that all communications systems contain "back doors" in their cryptosystems, ways for law enforcement and intelligence agencies to be able to read messages even though they're encrypted. By chance, there have also been articles on the Stuxnet computer worm, a very sophisticated piece of malware that many people are attributing to an arm of some government. The latter story shows why cryptographic back doors, known generically as "key escrow", are a bad idea. more»

ZeuS Botnet Takes a Hit But Already on the Rebound

Brian Krebs reporting in Krebs on Security: "Authorities in the United States, United Kingdom and Ukraine launched a series of law enforcement sweeps beginning late last month against some of the world's most notorious gangs running botnets powered by ZeuS, a powerful password-stealing Trojan horse program. ZeuS botnet activity worldwide took a major hit almost immediately thereafter, but it appears to be already on the rebound..." more»

Richard Clarke: Defend Against Cyberwar by Re-Architecting Networks, Not Buying More Technology

In his keynote yesterday at the RSA Security Conference, former U.S. top chief counter-terrorism adviser, Richard A. Clarke, said cyberwar defence efforts need to focus on re-architecting networks not buying more technology. more»

Finding the Holes in Your Application Security Blanket

Last month, application security provider Veracode came out with a study that stated that more than half of all enterprise applications aren't secure. The company tested approximately 2,900 applications over an 18-month period, and 57 percent failed to meet Veracode's "acceptable levels" of security. While this study gained a tremendous amount of traction in the media... it does not focus on the bigger issue... more»

Over Half of Critical Infrastructure Providers Report Politically Motivated Cyber Attacks

A recent study released today suggests 53 percent of critical infrastructure providers have experienced what they perceived as politically motivated cyber attacks. According to Symantec's 2010 Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Survey, participants claimed to have experienced such an attack on an average of 10 times in the past five years, incurring an average cost of $850,000 during a period of five years to their businesses. more»

Spam Volumes Down But Exact Cause Unknown

Brian Krebs reporting in Krebs on Security: "Spam trackers are seeing a fairly dramatic drop in junk e-mail sent over the past few days, specifically spam relayed by the one of the world's largest spam botnets -- although security experts disagree on exactly which botnet may be throttling back or experiencing problems." more»

Nothing to See Here

Three parallel events in US communications policy today, all reported on widely - but with a common thread. ... Law enforcement and national security officials want to make sure that they have the same ability to execute warrants and surveillance orders online that they had in the switched-telephone-circuit age -- which will mean substantial government design mandates for new software, hardware, and communications facilities. more»

Researchers Find Russian Spam Domains on the Rise

Jeremy Kirk from IDG News reports: "Researchers are seeing an uptick in the number of spam-related domains from Russian registrars, a sign that cybercriminals are choosing those providers due to lax enforcement. An analysis of spam messages over the last month showed that more than a third of domain names connected with spam are ".ru" ccTLDs (country code Top Level Domains), according to email security vendor M86." more»

Study Finds Majority of U.S. Gov't Agencies Fail to Meet Security Mandate for DNSSEC Adoption

Majority of U.S. Federal agencies using .gov domains have not signed their DNS with DNSSEC (Domain Name Security Extensions) despite a December 2009 Federal deadline for adoption, according to the latest report by IID (Internet Identity). IID analyzed the DNS of more than 2,900 .gov domains and has released the results in its "Q3 State of DNS Report". more»

Microsoft Releases a Cybersecurity eBook, Free Download

Micorsoft has released a 253 page cybersecurity ebook primarily intended for teens but also serves as a useful resource for adults interested in overall understanding of various Internet security topics. more»

NIST Issues Smart Grid Cybersecurity Guidelines

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued today its first Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security, which includes high-level security requirements, a framework for assessing risks, an evaluation of privacy issues at personal residences, and additional information for businesses and organizations to use as they craft strategies to protect the modernizing power grid from attacks, malicious code, cascading errors, and other threats. more»

IPv6 Posing New Security Issues

"The countdown to the saturation of the IPv4 address supply is now down to a matter of months: and along with the vast address space of the next-generation IPv6 architecture comes more built-in network security as well as some new potential security threats. ...its adoption also poses new security issues, everything from distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks to new vulnerabilities in IPv6 to misconfigurations that expose security holes." more»

Omnibus Cybersecurity Bill May Not Go Where Original Authors Intended

In an interview with GovInfoSecurity, Sen. Thomas Carper said that the U.S. Senate is considering attaching cybersecurity legislation to a defense authorizations bill. Though clearly a ploy to be able to say "we did something about those evil hackers" before the elections, CAUCE applauds the attempt. There can be no doubt that the United States (and many other countries) sorely needs better laws to deal with these threats. more»

IT Risks for Cloud Computing

As the industry-wide paradigm shift to cloud computing and software-as-a-service gradually continues to make the transition from buzz to reality, security and availability continue to emerge as the main barriers to customer adoption. A recent ISACA survey of over 1,800 US IT professionals found that only 17 percent believe the benefits of cloud computing outweigh the risks. Only one in 10 respondents said they would consider using software-as-a-service (SaaS) for mission-critical applications. more»