P2P

P2P / News Briefs

European Court of Justice: Courts in EU May Not Order ISPs to Filter Out P2P

The European Court of Justice has ruled that content owners cannot ask ISPs to filter out illegal content. The ruling could have implications for the creative industries as they attempt to crack down on piracy. The court said that while content providers can ask ISPs to block specific sites, wider filtering was in breach of the E-Commerce Directive. more»

Skype Now Officially Part of Microsoft

Microsoft formally announced the closure of its acquisition of Skype originally announced on May 10, 2011. Microsoft and Skype have declared to remain focused "on their shared goal of connecting all people across all devices and accelerating both companies' efforts to transform real-time communications for consumers and enterprise customers." more»

Microsoft to Acquire Skype

In an press release today, Microsoft has made the official announcement for the purchase of Skype — one the most expensive acquisitions to date according to the company. more»

Study Reports on Baseline of Global IPv6 Adoption

A new research on native IPv6 traffic across six large providers in North America and Europe suggest that despite fifteen years of IPv6 standards development, vendor releases and advocacy, only a small fraction of the Internet has adopted IPv6. "The slow rate of IPv6 adoption stems from equal parts of technical/design hurdles, lack of economic incentives and general dearth of IPv6 content." more»

Fed's Domain Name Crackdown Meets DNS Backlash

Kelly Jackson Higgins reporting in InformationWeek: "In the wake of federal crackdowns, such as the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) mass seizure yesterday of 82 domain names of websites illegally selling and distributing counterfeit and copyrighted items, a group is building out a new point-to-point DNS system as a way for sites to dodge future domain takeovers by the feds. ... Meanwhile, the new Dot-P2P Project says its goal is to combat DNS-level censoring with a decentralized, Bit Torrent-powered system. 'By creating a .p2p TLD that is totally decentralized and that does not rely on ICANN or any ISP's DNS service, and by having this application mimic force-encrypted bittorrent traffic, there will be a way to start combating DNS level based censoring like the new US proposals as well as those systems in use in countries around the world including China and Iran amongst others,' the Dot-P2P Project page says." more»

Pirate Bay Co-Founder Goes Public with Alternate P2P-Based DNS Project

A group led by former Pirate Bay co-founder Peter Sunde is forming to develop a peer-to-peer-based alternative to today's ICANN-controlled DNS system, according to a blog posted on Tuesday. A tweet on Sunde's account dated Nov 28 said: "Alternative dns root is step 1. Step 2 is the new DNS system that is in the making. It's not advanced, it's p2p and more secure." The tweet has generated a fair amount of interest according to Sunde who has written a follow up post on a blog called "P2P DNS". more»

ACTA Moving Forward in "Secrecy"

Reported in the Financial Times: "Persistent illegal downloaders face having their internet links disconnected under a secret trade deal being negotiated by developed nations this week, according to activists and industry groups. Leaked drafts of the anti-counterfeiting trade agreement [ACTA] say the world's biggest developed nations want internet service providers to be more responsible for the content they distribute -- and even cut off repeat infringers of copyright legislation. more»

12% of International Calls on Skype, Traffic Soaring According to Study

According to a recent study conducted by Telegeography, while international telephone traffic growth has slowed, Skype's traffic has soared. From the report: "Over the past 25 years, international call volume from telephones has grown at a compounded annual rate of 15 percent. In the past two years, however, international telephone traffic annual growth has slowed to only 8 percent, growing from 376 billion minutes in 2008 to an estimated 406 billion minutes in 2009. ... Skype's on-net international traffic (between two Skype users) grew 51 percent in 2008, and is projected to grow 63 percent in 2009, to 54 billion minutes." more»

Three Strikes Law Comes Into Effect in France

The first effects of France's new law against internet piracy will begin to be felt as the new year begins. The law was passed after a long struggle in parliament, and in the teeth of bitter opposition from groups opposed to internet restrictions. Illegal downloaders will be sent a warning e-mail, then a letter if they continue, and finally must appear before a judge if they offend again. more»

Video: Engineers in Washington Discuss How Pending US Regulations Could Impact the Internet

"What Will the Internet of the Future Look Like?," was the subject of a panel discussion held this week in Washington, DC, organized by the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF). The discussion was aimed at examining pending Internet regulations in the U.S. and their impact on packet discrimination, traffic shaping, network management, and carrier business models. The panel, moderated by Robert Atkinson, included: Richard Bennett; Dr. David Farber; Charles Jackson; and Jon Peha. more»

European Lawmakers Agreed on New Protections for Internet Users

Kevin J. O'Brien reporting in the New York Times: "European lawmakers on Thursday agreed on new protections for Internet users, striking a compromise between national governments seeking to impose tough anti-piracy laws and consumer organizations that wanted to enshrine Internet access as an unassailable right. The agreement removes the last hurdle to passage of sweeping changes to European telecommunications law, which had been held hostage for six months by the standoff over Internet access..." more»

ISPs Angry at New UK File-Sharing Policy

Internet service providers (ISPs) have reacted with anger to new proposals on how to tackle internet piracy. The government is proposing a tougher stance which would include cutting off repeat offenders from the net. UK ISP Talk Talk said the recommendations were likely to "breach fundamental rights" and would not work. more»

Pew Looks at the State of Online Music Ten Years After Napster

Pew Internet reporting on the 10th anniversary of the Napster's launch: "As researchers look back on the first decade of the 21st Century, many will no doubt point to the formative impact of file-sharing and peer-to-peer exchange of music on the internet. Distributed networks of socially-driven music sharing helped lay the foundation for mainstream engagement with participatory media applications. Napster and other peer-to-peer services "schooled" users in the social practice of downloading, uploading, and sharing digital content, which, in turn, has contributed to increased demand for broadband, greater processing power, and mobile media devices." more»

Sensitive US Government Data Leaked Via P2P Networks

Brian Krebs in the Washington Post reports: "The latest caches of sensitive data reportedly found on peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing networks are shocking: A highly sensitive document dated July 2009, listing the precise location of installations bearing weapons grade nuclear fuel in the United States; FBI surveillance photos of an alleged mafia hit man leaked while he was still on trial, along with the the government's witness list, some of whom are in the government's witness protection program; A U.S. Secret Service document on the location and layout of an emergency safe house for First Lady Michelle Obama. The revelations came at a House Government Oversight & Government Reform Committee hearing on the problem of inadvertent sharing of files via P2P software." more»

Digital Download Laws Force Users to Become Pirates, Says European Commissioner

European laws governing the digitization of content such as books, movies and music need a major re-working in order to keep Europe relevant in the digital age, said the European Commissioner for the information society and telecoms Viviane Reding on Thursday. Laying out her manifesto for a renewed five-year term in the job, Reding said in a speech that she shares the frustrations of Internet companies including Google, which would like to offer interesting business models in the field of online book publishing,"but cannot do so because of the fragmented regulatory system in Europe." more»