IPv6

Blogs

The Internet of Stupid Things

In those circles where Internet prognostications abound and policy makers flock to hear grand visions of the future, we often hear about the boundless future represented by "The Internet of Things". This phrase encompasses some decades of the computing industry's transition from computers as esoteric piece of engineering affordable only by nations, to mainframes, desktops, laptops, handhelds, and now wrist computers. Where next? more»

Internet.nl - A New Site to Easily Test Your Use of IPv6, DNSSEC, TLS and DKIM

"Is Your Internet Up-To-Date?" Does your existing Internet connection work with IPv6 and DNSSEC? Do your web sites support IPv6, DNSSEC and TLS? Is there a quick way to find out? Earlier this month a new site, Internet.nl, was launched to make this all easy for anyone to test. All you do is visit the site at en.internet.nl (also available in Dutch) and just follow the very easy links. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #10: Deploying IPv6 is Too Risky

After a quick break to catch our breath (and read all those IPv6 Security Resources), it's now time to look at our tenth and final IPv6 Security Myth. In many ways this myth is the most important myth to bust. Let's take a look at why... Myth: Deploying IPv6 Makes My Network Less Secure... I can hear you asking "But what about all those security challenges we identified in the other myths?" more»

IPv6 Security Myth #9: There Aren't Any IPv6 Security Resources

We are approaching the end of this 10 part series on the most common IPv6 security myths. Now it's time to turn our eyes away from security risks to focus a bit more on security resources. Today's myth is actually one of the most harmful to those who hold it. If you believe that there is no good information out there, it's nearly impossible to find that information. So let's get down to it and dispel our 9th myth. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #8: It Supports IPv6

Most of our IPv6 Security Myths are general notions, often passed on unwittingly between colleagues, friends, conference attendees, and others. Today's myth is one that most often comes specifically from your vendors or suppliers. Whether it's a hardware manufacturer, software developer, or Internet Service Provider (ISP), this myth is all about trust, but verify. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #7: 96 More Bits, No Magic

This week's myth is interesting because if we weren't talking security it wouldn't be a myth. Say what? The phrase "96 more bits, no magic" is basically a way of saying that IPv6 is just like IPv4, with longer addresses. From a pure routing and switching perspective, this is quite accurate. OSPF, IS-IS, and BGP all work pretty much the same, regardless of address family. Nothing about finding best paths and forwarding packets changes all that much from IPv4 to IPv6. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #6: IPv6 is Too New to be Attacked

Here we are, half-way through this list of the top 10 IPv6 security myths! Welcome to myth #6. Since IPv6 is just now being deployed at any real scale on true production networks, some may think that the attackers have yet to catch up. As we learned in Myth #2, IPv6 was actually designed starting 15-20 years ago. While it didn't see widespread commercial adoption until the last several years, there has been plenty of time to develop at least a couple suites of test/attack tools. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #5: Privacy Addresses Fix Everything!

Internet Protocol addresses fill two unique roles. They are both identifiers and locators. They both tell us which interface is which (identity) and tell us how to find that interface (location), through routing. In the last myth, about network scanning, we focused mainly on threats to IPv6 addresses as locators. That is, how to locate IPv6 nodes for exploitation. Today's myth also deals with IPv6 addresses as identifiers. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #4: IPv6 Networks are Too Big to Scan

Here we are, all the way up to Myth #4! That makes this the 4th installment of our 10 part series on the top IPv6 Security Myths. This myth is one of my favorite myths to bust when speaking with folks around the world. The reason for that is how many otherwise well-informed and highly experienced engineers, and others, hold this myth as truth. It's understandable, really. more»

Addressing 2014 - And Then There Were 2!

Time for another annual roundup from the world of IP addresses. What happened in 2014 and what is likely to happen in 2015? This is an update to the reports prepared at the same time in previous years. So lets see what has changed in the past 12 months in addressing the Internet and look at how IP address allocation information can inform us of the changing nature of the network itself. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #3: No IPv6 NAT Means Less Security

We're back again with part 3 in this 10 part series that seeks to bust 10 of the most common IPv6 security myths. Today's myth is a doozy. This is the only myth on our list that I have seen folks raise their voices over. For whatever reason, Network Address Translation (NAT) seems to be a polarizing force in the networking world. It also plays a role in differentiating IPv4 from IPv6. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #2: IPv6 Has Security Designed In

Today we continue with part 2 of the 10 part series on IPv6 Security Myths by debunking one of the myths I overhear people propagating out loud far too much: That you don't need to worry about security because IPv6 has it built into the protocol. In this post, we'll explore several of the reasons that this is in fact a myth and look at some harsh realities surrounding IPv6 security. more»

IPv6 Security Myth #1: I'm Not Running IPv6 so I Don't Have to Worry

Now that IPv6 is being actively deployed around the world, security is more and more a growing concern. Unfortunately, there are still a large number of myths that plague the IPv6 security world. These are things that people state as fact but simply aren't true. While traveling the world, talking to the people who've already deployed IPv6, I've identified what I believe are the ten most common IPv6 security myths. more»

The Christmas Goat and IPv6 (Year 5)

This year I didn't even get a good picture of our famous Christmas goat here in the city of Gavle Sweden. The Christmas goat this year survived Christmas but were suddenly on the 28th of December dismounted. The reason for the poor goat's early leave from its own little park downtown Gavle is that it is now the year of the goat in China, and the city of Gavle has a sister-town in China -- Zhuhai. more»

CircleID's Top 10 Posts of 2014

Here we are with CircleID's annual roundup of top ten most popular posts featured during 2014 (based on overall readership). Congratulations to all the participants whose posts reached top readership and best wishes for 2015. more»

News Briefs

IPv6 Adoption Brings New Security Risks

Paul Vixie on How the Openness of the Internet Is Poisoning Us

Vint Cerf: Ask Your ISPs What Their Plan Is for IPv6

Meeting Held in Uruguay to Consider Current Issues Affecting the Future of the Internet

Switzerland Overtakes Romania as Top IPv6 Adopter

INET Denver: IPv4 Exhaustion and the Path to IPv6

Akamai Reports 460 Times Increase in IPv6 Requests Over Its Platform Since Last Year

Most U.S. Agencies Expected to Miss IPv6 Deadline

Internet Society ION Conferences: Call for Speakers - IPv6 and DNSSEC Experts

Vint Cerf: The Launch of a New Larger Internet

Apple Under Criticism for Back-Pedaling on IPv6 Support

Department of Commerce Cancels IANA Contract RFP

IPv6 Adoption Grows By 1900% - Primarily Due to Domain Name Registrar Support

Comcast Begins Pilot Market Deployment of IPv6

Report on Today's State of DNS Services

Malaysian Government to Fully Adopt IPV6 by End of 2012

World IPv6 Day a Success, Demonstrated Global Readiness for IPv6, Says ISOC

A Closer Look at World IPv6 Day

RIPE NCC to Conduct Live Measurements for World IPv6 Day

Citrix Case Study Features Nixu DDI

Most Viewed

Explaining China's IPv9

Is the Internet Dying?

Adult-Related TLDs Considered Dangerous

DHCP for IPv4 vs. IPv6 - What You Need to Know

IPv6: Extinction, Evolution or Revolution?

Most Commented

IPv6: Extinction, Evolution or Revolution?

A Balkanized Internet Future?

Comments on an IP Address Trading Market

Removing Need at RIPE

IPv6 and LTE, the Not So Long Term Evolution?

Industry Updates

Participants – Random Selection