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Cybersecurity / Featured Blogs

There is Always a Back Door

A long time ago, I worked in a secure facility. I won't disclose the facility; I'm certain it no longer exists, and the people who designed the system I'm about to describe are probably long retired. Soon after being transferred into this organization, someone noted I needed to be trained on how to change the cipher door locks. We gathered up a ladder, placed the ladder just outside the door to the secure facility, popped open one of the tiles on the drop ceiling, and opened a small metal box with a standard, low-security key. more

What's in Your DNS Query?

Privacy problems are an area of wide concern for individual users of the Internet -- but what about network operators? Geoff Huston wrote an article earlier this year concerning privacy in DNS and the various attempts to make DNS private on the part of the IETF -- the result can be summarized with this long, but entertaining, quote. more

Facebook, Privacy, and Cryptography

There has long been pressure from governments to provide back doors in encryption systems. Of course, if the endpoints are insecure it doesn't matter much if the transmission is encrypted; indeed, a few years ago, I and some colleagues even suggested lawful hacking as an alternative. Crucially, we said that this should be done by taking advantage of existing security holes rather than be creating new ones. more

Recalibrating the DoH Debate

At the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) it is time we accept the wide range of drivers behind (and implications of) standards and for stakeholders to start listening to each other. A protocol recently released by the IETF, DNS over HTTPS (DoH), is at the centre of an increasingly polarised debate. This is because DoH uses encryption in the name of security and privacy and re-locates DNS resolution to the application layer of the Internet. more

GDPR Fine Enough or More Disclosure?

The UK cares about its citizens' privacy to the tune of a $229 million (US) fine of British Airways for a breach that disclosed information of approximately half a million customers. It's exciting -- a significant fine for a significant loss of data. I think GDPR will lead to improved security of information systems as companies scramble to avoid onerous fines and start to demand more from those who provide information security services and products. more

WHOIS Database Download: Proactive Defense Against the Rising Tide of BEC Fraud

How many times have you heard that humans are the weakest link in cybersecurity? The headlines have proven that over and over again. In particular, business email compromise or BEC (also known as email account compromise or EAC) scams, which typically target an employee with access to the financial resources of his company -- this could be a C-level executive or any high-ranking officer -- for fraud are still on a constant uphill trend. more

Network Protocols and Their Use

In June, I participated in a workshop, organized by the Internet Architecture Board, on the topic of protocol design and effect, looking at the differences between initial design expectations and deployment realities. These are my impressions of the discussions that took place at this workshop. ... In this first part of my report, I'll report on the case studies of two protocol efforts and their expectations and deployment experience. more

State Department Should Return to Its Knitting

Having researched and written about the 100 year history of U.S. State Department's institutional machinations in the telecom/cyber sector, taught law school graduate courses, and worked with its bureaus and staff over the past 45 years, the latest twists and turns seem to repeat past mistakes. The fundamental problem is that the U.S. is the only country whose Foreign Ministry is given a significant role and engaged in telecom and cyber matters in global venues. more

A Quick Look at the 4 Most Prevalent Types of Threat Intelligence

You won't go far with your cybersecurity when you're relying on the wrong intelligence. This is simply because not all types of threat intelligence are equal. You might have experienced this yourself; investing time and resources into just one only to receive meagre results in the end. Sadly, many organizations fail to realize that depending on just a single source of information is a big mistake. more

Making Voting Easy is Scaring the Life Out of Security Experts

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight which landed the first two humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours later, and Aldrin joined him 19 minutes later. The two astronauts spent about two and a quarter hours outside the spacecraft, and they collected 47.5 pounds of lunar material to bring back. more

Industry Updates

Using Threat Intelligence Feeds to Prevent Orcus RAT Infections

Billtrust Breach: Can Threat Intelligence Platforms Help with Ransomware Prevention?

Post NordVPN Data Exposure: Using Domain Threat Intelligence to Prevent MitM Attacks

InterMed Breach: How Threat Intelligence Sources Help Maintain Domain Integrity

BriansClub & PoS Malware Attacks: How Threat Intelligence Solutions Help Prevent Payment Card Theft

How Reverse WHOIS Search Can Help Protect Against MegaCortex and Other Ransomware

The Web.com Data Breach: A Quick Investigation with Domain Reputation Lookup

Do Security Service Providers Need Their Own Data Scientists?

SOAR Versus SIEM: The Fundamental Differences

Being Cybersecure Is Not Enough, Become Cyber-Resilient Instead

Is Your Organization Mature Enough for Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response?

Can Security Analytics Combat Digital Fraud with IP and Domain Name Monitoring?

Afilias Endorses Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace Final Report at Paris Peace Forum

Moving from the Castle-and-Moat to the Zero-Trust Model

What to Look for in Digital Forensics and Incident Response Experts