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Atrivo, Notorious U.S. Based ISP Completely Cut Off by Its Network Providers

The troubled California based commercial Internet service provider, Atrivo also known as Intercage, accused of serving spammers and cyber-crime groups, went offline after its last network backbone provider recently pulled the plug. Atrivo "ceased to be reachable from any points on the Internet early Sunday morning when the ISP's sole remaining provider -- Pacific Internet Exchange (PIE) -- stopped routing traffic for the troubled company," reports Brian Krebs of the Washington Post. more»

Comcast Discloses Network Management Practices

Comcast has provided U.S. regulators details of how it plans to change the way it manages Web traffic over its high speed Internet network without blocking any applications or content. The move comes after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted last month to uphold a complaint that Comcast had violated the regulator's open-Internet principles by hindering peer-to-peer traffic from applications such as BitTorrent. Comcast said on Friday that under the plan designed to give all users their "fair share" of bandwidth it would focus on managing the traffic of customers who are using most bandwidth when the network is congested. more»

EFF Says Stop Illegal Surveillance; Sues NSA, President Bush, and Vice President Cheney

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and other government agencies today on behalf of AT&T customers to stop the alleged illegal, unconstitutional, and ongoing dragnet surveillance of their communications and communications records. The five individual plaintiffs are also suing President George W. Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, Cheney's chief of staff David Addington, former Attorney General and White House Counsel Alberto Gonzales and other individuals who have ordered or participated in the domestic surveillance. more»

Interactive Deployment Database of Global WiMAX Deployments Released

The WiMAX Forum has released an Interactive Deployment Database, providing a resource of more than 300 WiMAX deployments across the world. Available for public use, this tool includes detailed information on each of the operators, stage and type of deployment, as well as spectrum utilized. The database is planned to be updated quarterly with the latest information. more»

Comcast Sues FCC, Says Net Neutrality Order Legally Inappropriate

Comcast has filed suit against the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today in order to block the agency's decision to sanction Comcast for blocking certain Internet traffic. Comcast has released the following statement attributed to David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President of Comcast Corporation... more»

Internet Services Will be Worth Nearly $1 Trillion by 2012, Says Report

According to a report by the research firm Yankee Group, the global market for high-speed Internet services will be worth nearly $1 trillion by 2012. The broadband market, which includes revenue from services to consumers and businesses, as well as the amount spent on equipment for the underlying infrastructure, is currently worth $590 billion, according to the report. By 2012, the market will grow to more than $903 billion, it projected. The estimates are part of Yankee Group's concept of an "Anywhere" environment, where there is at least one broadband connection for every person on the planet. Emily Green, president and chief executive of Yankee Group, says it took 10 years for the Internet to reach one billion people and it will double its reach by 2012. more»

More Airlines Signing Up for Aircell's Wi-Fi Service

Aircell, the company that provides the new Gogo Internet service on some American Airlines flights, is reported to be signing another airline to its service. Aircell management expects there will be some 2,000 commercial airplanes offering Gogo by the end of next year... "American Airlines has installed Gogo on 15 airplanes for flights between New York and Los Angeles, Miami, and San Francisco, and Delta says it'll have Gogo available across its domestic fleet of 330 commercial jets within a year. Delta is expected to expand that service to Northwest Airlines flights if the merger of those two companies goes through as planned..." more»

Google Further Expanding the Undersea Communications Cable System

Following last year's report on the Unity trans-Pacific submarine cable project, research company, TeleGeography reports today that "Google is working with a consortium of carriers planning to build an intra-Asian submarine cable system. The new cable, dubbed the Southeast Asia Japan Cable (SJC), would link Unity's landing station in Japan to Guam, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore." Report further indicates that the work is still in the planning phase. 'Given the current flurry of undersea cables under construction, the SJC cable will probably not be ready for service until 2011 at the earliest,' said TeleGeography analyst Alan Mauldin. more»

One of China's Largest ISPs Under DNS Cache Poisoning Attack

One of China's largest ISPs has recently fallen victim to the DNS vulnerability. The security company Websense has reported that the DNS cache on the default DNS server used by the China's Netcom customers has been poisoned. The incident was first discovered on Tuesday, Aug 19th, by Websense's Beijing lab. Webssense researchers say they have seen other DNS vulnerability attacks however decided to publicize this particular case because of its uniqueness. According to reports, hackers have only exploited one of Netcom's DNS servers in China. When China's Netcom customers mistype and enter an invalid domain name, the poisoned DNS server directs the visitor's browser to a page that contains malicious code. more»

Why Broadband Competition Is As Good As It Gets, Explains Telecom Analyst

Broadband competition in the US is as good as it gets in the foreseeable future and will potentially decrease according to telecom and tech regulatory analyst, Blair Levin. "There's not that much left to be disruptive," Levin said. "White spaces could be in rural areas, and a little bit in broadband, but I don't think so. Other things that people are looking to be disruptive I don't think will happen." more»

P4P Aims to Solve Bandwidth Challenges

Two professors from the University of Washington and Yale University, presenting at a conference in Seattle today, describe a new and faster data transfer technology across the Internet. Professors Arvind Krishnamurthy and Richard Yang believe their technology offers a better solution to current challenges facing broadband providers. Their algorithm, called P4P or "local file-sharing," finds the shortest path across the Internet by tracking users' locations -- improving both, download speeds by about 20% as well as bandwidth requirements. more»

FCC Chief Wants Broadband Across USA, Proposes "Free Broadband"

High-speed Internet access is so important to the welfare of U.S. consumers that America can't afford not to offer it -- free of charge -- to anybody who wants it, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Kevin Martin has told USA TODAY. Leslie Cauley reports: "Martin wants to use a block of wireless spectrum to help bridge the gap. By attaching a 'free broadband' condition to the sale of the spectrum, known as AWS-3 (for advanced wireless services-3), Martin thinks he can help drive broadband adoption in rural areas in particular. Only 25% of network capacity would have to be reserved for free broadband. The rest could be used to provide premium broadband services." Karl Bode of DSLreports.com however... more»

Comcast Given 30 Days to Disclose Network Management Practices, Says FCC Order

In follow up to August 1st ruling against Comcast, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in a 67 page order released today has given Comcast 30 days "to disclose the details of their unreasonable network management practices, submit a compliance plan describing how it intends to stop these unreasonable management practices by the end of the year, and disclose to both the Commission and the public the details of the network management practices that it intends to deploy following termination of its current practices." more»

ISP Deep Packet Inspection Remains a Probable Option, Despite Controversies

A US firm was among ISPs operating in Argentina that recently received orders from the country's Department of Justice to put a stop to all local traffic visiting a particular gambling website operating without a license. An anonymous source, according to Ian Lamont of The Industry Standard, has said that Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) was floated as a possible option to accomplish this task although later not implemented due to high costs. Lamont reports: "The DPI approach would be troubling on a number of levels. First, any ISP using DPI is going beyond a government mandate to simply block traffic to a particular site. The ISPs would actually be peering inside their customers' Web traffic without their knowledge." Although DPI wasn't used in this particular case, "it will probably be considered in the future as a way to take offensive or illegal sites offline." more»

Lawrence Lessig's Reaction to McCain's Technology Plan

In reaction to U.S. republican presidential candidate John McCain's release of his technology policy statement on August 14, Lawrence Lessig has released a video presentation criticizing the tech plan for lack of change to important issues such as broadband penetration declines in the country. Early during the video presentation, Lessig has this to say: "...the single most important fact about internet's development in last decade has been the extraordinary decline United States has faced with respect to our competitive partners. We started the Bush administration at no. 5, we will end at no. 22. And the question anybody should be asking about internet policy here, is why we did so poorly and what change there might be to reverse that decline..." more»

Industry Updates