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IETF Forms Working Group to Address Scalability Issues Caused by Multihoming

The IETF is forming a new working group to address scalability issues in the Internet's routing system caused by companies splitting their network traffic over multiple carriers, a practice called multihoming. The new working group will build upon a base proposal from a team of Cisco engineers to create a new tunneling mechanism [dubbed LISP for Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol] that will be used by the Internet's edge and core routers. more»

Debate Over Net Neutrality and Networks Built With Broadband Stimulus Money Heats Up

Carriers and net neutrality proponents found themselves at odds Monday during a discussion on whether to place strict net neutrality conditions on any broadband network built using economic stimulus money. Held at the U.S. Department of Commerce in Washington, D.C., Monday, the panel discussion was intended to give the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) guidelines for funding companies that pledge to built out broadband networks in underserved areas... more»

Tim Berners-Lee Attacks DPI, Calls it Electronic Equivalent of Opening People's Mail

Speaking at a House of Lords event to mark the 20th anniversary of the invention of the World Wide Web, Berners-Lee said that deep packet inspection (DPI) was the electronic equivalent of opening people's mail. "This is very important to me, as what is at stake is the integrity of the internet as a communications medium," Berners-Lee said on Wednesday. "Clearly we must not interfere with the internet, and we must not snoop on the internet. If we snoop on clicks and data, we can find out a lot more information about people than if we listen to their conversations." more»

Reports of First Public Meeting Discussing Distribution of $7.2 Billion US Broadband Stimulus

Cecilia Kang of the Washington Post reporting: "The Obama administration yesterday unveiled the first steps of its plan to pour $8 billion into the construction of new broadband Internet networks around the nation. And while many details haven't been finalized on how the stimulus money will be spent and who will qualify for the grants, interest in the high-speed Internet plan was high. Long lines stretched outside the Commerce Department building, where the three federal agencies in charge of the broadband stimulus plan hosted the first of seven public meetings..." more»

Another Look at the Broadband Gap in US

Saul Hansell of the New York Times is writing a series of posts examining the state of broadband in US and what the country can learn from broadband deployment in other nations. Hansell writes: "In Japan, broadband service running at 150 megabits per second (Mbps) costs $60 a month. The fastest service available now in the United States is 50 Mbps at a price of $90 to $150 a month. In London, $9 a month buys 8 Mbps service. In New York, broadband starts at $20 per month, for 1 Mbps. In Iceland, 83 percent of the households are connected to broadband. In the United States, the adoption rate is 59 percent." more»

U.S. Lobbyists Working on Europe's Net Neutrality Debate in Order to Influence U.S. Outcomes

As European lawmakers debate how to keep access to the Internet free and equal -- so-called network neutrality -- they are being bombarded, not unsurprisingly, by lobbyists... As the reputation of Europe grows as the world's technology regulator, representatives in a conflict that pits the AT&Ts and Verizons against the Googles and Yahoos are attempting to shape European law in the hopes that U.S. regulators will follow suit. more»

Obama Officially Nominates Julius Genachowski as FCC Chairman

President Barack Obama has officially nominated Julius Genachowski as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), according to statements released from the White House. Genachowski, who must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, was widely expected to be offered the position regulating the industry. He was a top aide to the FCC chairman under Democratic president Bill Clinton, a classmate of Obama's from Harvard Law School and has been advising Obama on telecoms policy. more»

Obama's Budget Submitted to Lawmakers Hits Wireless Carriers with Huge Fees for Spectrum License

he Obama administration Feb. 26 proposed to tax wireless carriers as much as $550 million per year for the right to hold a spectrum license. The fee would be in addition to the billions carriers have already paid in spectrum auctions held by the FCC (Federal Communications Commission). Under the budget outline provided by the Obama administration, the new fees would be used to help reduce the $1.7 trillion national deficit. The proposal before Congress would charge carriers like AT&T, Verizon and Sprint $50 million this year. The fee per carrier would jump to $200 million in 2010 and eventually rise to $550 million by 2019. more»

Australia's Censorship Plan Reaching Dead End

Australian government's plan to introduce mandatory internet censorship has effectively been scuttled, following an independent senator's decision to join the Greens and Opposition (also see post on backlash) in blocking any legislation required to get the scheme started. The Opposition's communications spokesman Nick Minchin has this week obtained independent legal advice saying that if the Government is to pursue a mandatory filtering regime "legislation of some sort will almost certainly be required". more»

FCC Fines Telecoms with $12 Million Over Customer Privacy Requirements

Federal regulators proposed Tuesday to impose more than $12 million in fines on 600 telecoms that failed to file paperwork in 2008 explaining how they protect their customers' private information. At issue are annual reports that phone companies, internet telephony concerns, and calling card companies need to file explaining how they protect individuals' phone records, cell phone location data and personal information from data brokers and over-the-line private investigators... more»

India to Block Close to 39 Foreign VoIP Service Providers

The Hindu Business Line reports that the Department of Telecom (DoT) in India has issued orders to block Internet telephony services being offered by around 39 foreign firms in the country. All the Internet Service Providers have been asked to block these websites since Indian laws permit only licensed operators to offer Net telephony services. Service providers blacklisted include voiptalk.org, sipgate.co.uk, voiplus.net, and deltathree.com more»

New Internet Study Finds Web and Streaming Higher Than P2P Traffic

ipoque, a European deep packet inspection hardware provider has published an Internet study for 2008/2009 providing an overview of the Internet's current state based on analyzing 1.3 petabytes of Internet traffic -- "the amount of data equal to 300,000 DVDs" -- in eight regions of the world (Northern Africa, Southern Africa, South America, Middle East, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Southwestern Europe, Germany). The study includes the use of about 100 of the most popular Internet protocols including P2P, VoIP, media streaming, instant messaging. more»

Verizon Tops US ISPs for Spam Abuse, Plans Prevention and Shift to Port 587

Brian Krebs of Washington Post reporting: "Verizon.net is home to more than twice as many spam-spewing zombies as any other major Internet service provider in the United States, according to an analysis of the most recent data from anti-spam outfit Spamhaus.org. Verizon, however, says it plans to put measures in place to prevent it from being used as a home to so many spammers. ... If spammers are attracted to the company's network, it may be because Verizon still allows customers to send e-mail on Port 25, the communications channel that is traditionally used by large organizations to send e-mail." more»

FTC Issues New Privacy Guidelines for ISPs, Mobile Companies

Federal regulators tweaked recommendations for how websites should collect, save and share information about users, extending them to Internet service providers and mobile users. The Federal Trade Commission issued new guidance on Thursday for the self-regulated industry that urges websites to tell consumers that data is being collected during their searches and to allow them to opt out. more»

AT&T, Comcast in Possible Agreement With Music Industry for New Antipiracy Campaign

How does the Recording Industry Association of America plan to stop illegal file sharing? Perhaps by turning two of America's largest Internet service providers into stooges. Last year, after a round of very public defeats over its plans to sue individuals for illegal file sharing, the RIAA unveiled a new plan to have ISPs do its dirty work. Now, AT&T and Comcast may have signed on to do just that. more»