Cybercrime

Cybercrime / Featured Blogs

The Importance of Understanding Attacker Target Selection

There's a bit of a debate going on about whether the Kaseya attack exploited a 0-day vulnerability. While that's an interesting question when discussing, say, patch management strategies, I think it's less important to understand attackers' thinking than understand their target selection. In a nutshell, the attackers have outmaneuvered defenders for almost 30 years when it comes to target selection. more

Examining Real Examples of DNS Abuse: A Summary Overview of the 2nd DNS Abuse Forum

It was not without a little trepidation that I planned the 2nd DNS Abuse Institute Forum to focus on the long-standing and often contentious definitional issues surrounding DNS Abuse. While the risk of getting stuck in the usual entrenched positions was real, it seemed to me that we had an opportunity to provide some clarity and if not change minds, at least provide perspective. more

Your Cybersecurity is Only as Strong as Your Weakest Vendor

Managing the risk of third parties has become a compliance focus for many large organizations. Companies even work with third-party service providers and external vendors just to manage this risk. The recent SolarWinds attack escalates the critical need for chief compliance officers to collaborate with their business counterparts to identify and mitigate potentially unknown threats that lie within third-party supply chains. Yet how can companies manage this risk when it's not if but when you're attacked? more

Vendor Selection Matters in the Domain Registrar Ecosystem

Domain name abuse is one of the most dangerous and under-regulated issues in digital business security today. Many of the largest companies in the world still lack basic domain security protocols, making them prime targets for bad actors. An attack on a domain can lead to the redirection of a company's website, domain spoofing, domain and domain name system (DNS) hijacking attacks, phishing attacks, network breaches, and business email compromise (BEC). more

Trusted Notifiers and the Future of DNS Abuse

Efforts have been ongoing in the ICANN community to develop a better understanding of its role in the combat of abuse. This theme has been rising in prominence every year since 2018, and 2021 appears to be the tipping point, in which consensus has built around the idea that more can be accomplished in terms of reducing the impact of rogue actors using the Internet for malicious purposes. more

What Are the Connections to Identified Hafnium Malicious IP Addresses?

Cyber attackers are very skilled at infiltration. They'd find ways into a house through cracks and holes that the homeowner doesn't know about. Analogically speaking, that's what the new cyber attack group dubbed "Hafnium" did when they identified several zero-day Microsoft Exchange vulnerabilities to get into target networks. With thousands of users for every Microsoft Exchange server, the attack has far-reaching implications. First, it establishes the presence of a new threat actor group in town. What else could they be up to? more

The Path to Combatting Domain Abuse

Completely eradicating malware, botnets, phishing, pharming, and spam from the Domain Name System is not possible. That may be an odd statement from someone who just took the leadership position at the DNS Abuse Institute, but it's meant to underscore the scope of the work ahead of us. There will always be bad actors exploiting the DNS for their own criminal purposes, but working together, we can mitigate their impact. more

Four-Pronged Approach to Keep Your Domain Names and DNS Secure from Cyberattacks

Domain names, domain name systems (DNS), and digital certificates are fundamental components of the most important applications that enable your company to conduct business - including your website, email, voice-over IP, and more. However, these vital applications are being attacked with an increasingly high level of sophistication and severity. more

The Future of Europe's Fight Against Child Sexual Abuse

Like much of how the Internet is governed, the way we detect and remove child abuse material online began as an ad hoc set of private practices. In 1996, an early online child protection society posted to the Usenet newsgroup alt.binaries.pictures.erotica.children (yes, such a thing really existed) to try to discourage people from posting such "erotica" on the assumption that the Internet couldn't be censored. more

The Netizen's Guide to Reboot the Root (Part II)

The first part of this series explained how Amendment 35 to the NTIA-Verisign cooperative agreement is highly offensive to the public interest. But the reasons for saving the Internet are more fundamental to Western interests than a bad deal made under highly questionable circumstances. One of the world's foremost experts on conducting censorship at scale, the Chinese Communist Party's experience with the Great Firewall... more

Industry Updates

Could the LGBTQ Community Be a Target of Internet Threat Actors?

Domains Are a Critical Component of Your Enterprise Risk Management

Are There More Properties Connected to the Pareto Botnet?

A Glimpse of Big Telcos' Domains and Subdomains Footprints

Return on Investment: Proving That Protection Pays

Top Music Streaming Services: What's Their Potential Domains & Subdomains Attack Surface?

More from DarkSide? We Ran an Analysis of Additional Identified Artifacts

Internet Threats Go Viral – Companies Must React to Keep Brands Secure

ZeuS, Still Alive and Kicking in the Form of Jabber ZeuS?

SideWinder DNS Blackholes Uncovered with Threat Intelligence Platform

Given a Malicious Email Address, What Can You Discover with Maltego's WhoisXML API Transforms?

Crypto-Related Domains and Subdomains: What's Underneath the 30K of Them?

A Deep Dive into Known Magecart IoCs: What Are the Connected Internet Properties?

COVID-19-Related Bulk Domain Registrations: A Possible Case of DNS Abuse?

Together for the Good of the Internet: eco Complaints Office Registers More Reports Than Ever Before