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Brand Protection / News Briefs

Content Filtering Ineffective, Harmful According to Public Knowledge Study

A report released today by Public Knowledge points out that their recent analysis indicates filtering Internet content, as advocated by media companies, will not be effective and in fact harmful to the Internet. An accompanying 60-page whitepaper contains the full report including a number of reasons why the user of copyright filters should not be allowed, encouraged or mandated on U.S. Internet Service Provider (ISP) networks. more

Digital Download Laws Force Users to Become Pirates, Says European Commissioner

European laws governing the digitization of content such as books, movies and music need a major re-working in order to keep Europe relevant in the digital age, said the European Commissioner for the information society and telecoms Viviane Reding on Thursday. Laying out her manifesto for a renewed five-year term in the job, Reding said in a speech that she shares the frustrations of Internet companies including Google, which would like to offer interesting business models in the field of online book publishing,"but cannot do so because of the fragmented regulatory system in Europe." more

World Copyright Summit This Week Will Focus on Threats and Opportunities of Internet on Copyright

Movie directors, composers, authors, legal experts, policy-makers and others are meeting this week in Washington DC to discuss the "threats and opportunities" the Internet poses to copyright in the digital age. Some 500 delegates from more than 55 countries are scheduled to attend the 2nd World Copyright Summit being held on Tuesday and Wednesday at the Ronald Reagan Convention Center... more

Broad Reform of EU Telecoms Law Facing Obstacles In Dealing with Internet Piracy

European Union lawmakers failed to overcome the last remaining obstacle to a broad reform of the E.U.'s telecommunications laws late Tuesday, when a committee of the European Parliament rejected a compromise on the issue of how to deal with Internet piracy. While national governments including those in France and the U.K., two of the largest of the E.U.'s 27 members, push for greater powers to crack down on copyright abuse by illegal file sharers, the industry committee of the European Parliament stood by an earlier pledge to protect citizens from what it views as over-zealous policing of the internet. more

Court Finds Pirate Bay Defendants Guilty, With Jail Sentence

A Swedish court on Friday found all four defendants guilty in a copyright test case involving one of the world's biggest free file-sharing websites. "The Stockholm disctrict court has today found guilty the four individuals that were charged with accessory to breaching copyright laws," the court said in a statement. "The court has sentenced each of them to one year in prison." more

Google Changes Chrome License Terms

Some of the harshest criticisms concerning Google's newly released Chrome browser related to its very broad license agreement. Consequently on Wednesday, Google said that it was planning to change Chrome's User License agreement where it appeared to give Google a perpetual right to use anything a user entered into the browser. As of Wednesday 2 p.m. PT, the terms were indeed changed with Section 11 now reading simply: "11.1 You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services." more

YouTube Allowed to Mask Important User Data in Viacom Case

Defendants and plaintiffs in two copyright infringement lawsuits against YouTube have reached a deal to protect the privacy of millions of YouTube watchers during evidence discovery, a spokesman for Google said late Monday. In a related blog post, Google says, "we are pleased to report that Viacom, MTV and other litigants have backed off their original demand for all users' viewing histories and we will not be providing that information." On July 4, YouTube had received a court order to produce viewing history data of its users to Viacom. more

Law Expert Suggests Business-Funded Domain Name Protection Groups

John Mackenzie, an intellectual property and technology law expert at Pinsent Masons, says businesses should band together to tackle the multi-million dollar cybersquatting industry pro-actively. "What is really needed and what may occur is a trade organization pushing a policing function whose only purpose is to chase these people," said Mackenzie, saying that it could be similar to business-funded copyright protection groups such as the Business Software Alliance. more

Cybersquatting Cases Rose 25 Percent Last Year, Says WIPO

The U.N. copyright agency (World Intellectual Property Organization) that arbitrates more than half the world's "cybersquatting" cases saw a 25 percent increase in complaints last year. WIPO received 1,823 complaints in 2006 alleging abusive registrations of trademarks as Internet domain names. more