Law

Law / News Briefs

California Man Gets 6 Years in Prison for Phishing

A California man who was found guilty earlier this year for operating a sophisticated phishing scheme that attempted to deceive thousands of AOL users has now received a prison sentence of 70 months -- a fraction of the 101 years he could have been given. InformationWeek reports: "In the first jury conviction under the Can-Spam Act of 2003, Jeffrey Brett Goodin, of Azusa, Calif., was convicted of sending thousands of e-mails set up to appear to be from AOL's billing department to the company's users, prompting them to reply with personal and credit-card information. He then used the information to make unauthorized purchases, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Los Angeles." more

Business 2.0 Does Front Page Story on the Most Powerful Unknown Domainer

Business 2.0 Magazine is running a front page story on Kevin Ham, considered as one of the most powerful "domainer", and how he has managed to build a $300 million empire using everything from domain tasting to typo-squatting the entire nation of Cameroon. From the article, "Ham's people installed a line of software, called a 'wildcard,' that reroutes traffic addressed to any .cm domain name that isn't registered. In the case of Cameroon, a country of 18 million..." more

Starbucks Chairman, Founder Called Typosquatter and Typosquasher

Starbucks chairman and founder, Mr. Schultz's venture capital firm, Seattle-based Maveron, and H. Ross Perot's investment arm last month plowed $38 million into iREIT, a Houston-based company that has been accused of typosquatting by telecom giant Verizon. But earlier this year, Maveron also invested in Aliso Viejo, California-based CitizenHawk, which makes software that helps trademark holders identify typosquatters and initiate legal action against them. more

Domain Name Arbitration Disputes on Rise

Internet domain name arbitration disputes have risen by more than a quarter since January 2005 -- despite the expansion of generic top-level domain addresses like .biz and .info -- as cybersquatters find more sophisticated ways of encroaching on legitimate Web sites.

...Typosquatting, a form of cybersquatting that involves capturing another company's Web traffic by registering misspelled versions of a well-known Internet site or brand name, is driving much of the growth in domain-name disputes, according to intellectual property lawyers. more

Company Claims Right to SEX.EU Under Unusual Legal Interpretation

Yellow was the first company with a prior right to the term 'sex' to apply for the domain, which is usually enough to be successful in being awarded it. Yellow had a registered trade mark for the term 'sex'. Topeu on the other hand claimed it had a greater right to the domain because it had registered a trademark for the entire phrase 'sex.eu'... more

Tom Cruise Wins TomCruise.com, Hardly Unpredictable

The UDRP process (there is no appeal) has become so polarised that if you were provided with the names of the panelists in any given case, you could predict with almost complete certainly what the outcome was, regardless of the merits of the case actually being heard.

So while Jeff Burgar is an extreme example of a domain registrant, Tom Cruise's victory serves only to highlight the need to reform the domain arbitration process. more

Cat Loses Domain to Morgan Stanley

Baroness Penelope Cat of Nash DCB, who is listed as the owner of mymorganstanleyplatinum.com and was given some assistance in the case by Michael Woods, lost control of the domain to Morgan Stanley.

A key part of the case rested on whether or not Baroness Penelope was truly the owner of the domain... "Respondent maintains that it is a cat, that is, a well-known carnivorous quadruped which has long been domesticated," summarised Richard Hill. "However, it is equally well-known that the common cat, whose scientific name is Felis domesticus, cannot speak or read or write." more

Class-Action Lawsuit Filed Against Yahoo for Typosquatting

A class-action lawsuit [PDF] filed Monday against Yahoo! Inc. and group of unnamed third-parties accuses the company of engaging in "syndication fraud" against advertisers who pay Yahoo to display their ads on search results and on the Web pages of partner Web sites. The suit claims that Yahoo displayed these advertisers' online ads via spyware and adware products and on so-called "typosquatter" Web sites that capitalize on misspellings of popular trademarks or company names.

Potentially more explosive is the plaintiff's claim that Yahoo regularly uses its relationship with adware and typosquatting sites to gin up extra revenue around earnings time, alleging that the company is conspiring to boost revenue by partnering with some of the Internet's seamier characters. more