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YouTube Serving Over 2 Billion Views a Day in 5th Year of Operation

YouTube is celebrating it's 5th year in operation and now reports serving over 2 billion views a day. "I think we will see it on more devices and see it used more for live streaming. There are real opportunities for it to become a traditional content distributor like the cable channels. YouTube streams make up around 40% of all online video watched in the US, so there is massive scale there and lot of opportunity," says Ryan Lawler of video site NewTeeVee.com more»

Pew Internet Reports Latest Online Video Stats

According to a report released today, 69% of adult internet users, or roughly half of all U.S. adults (52%), have used the internet to watch or download video, with 18-29 year-olds leading the way. "We are seeing a surge in online video watching that is driven by a combination of broadband access, the increasing use of social networking sites, and the popularity of video-sharing sites," explains Kristen Purcell, Associate Director for Research at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project and author of the report. "To tap into these trends, untold numbers of websites now showcase online video as part of their content." more»

Global IPTV to Reach 81 Million Users by 2013, 32% Annual Growth

The number of global IPTV subscribers will grow from 26.7 million in 2009 to 81 million in 2013, a compound annual growth rate of 32%, according to the latest Research and Markets IPTV Global Forecast Report. Regarding service revenue, the Global IPTV market is $6.7 billion in 2009 and growing to $19.9 billion in 2013, a compound annual growth rate of 31%. By 2013, the report forecasts Europe and North America will generate a larger share of global revenue, due to very low ARPUs (average revenue per user) in China and India, the fastest growing (and ultimately, the biggest markets) in Asia. more»

Clues about the Future of TV

A recent article chronicles the telcos' slow start in cable TV. I don't think the telcos stand a chance of succeeding in cable TV. Instead, if they're to succeed at all, they'll probably buy or form alliances with existing cablecos... But they'd better start swimming, because the times are a changing.. more»

Netflix Dominating North American Bandwidth, Surpassing YouTube

Farhad Manjoo reporting in Slate: "It's not just Canada. Netflix is swallowing America's bandwidth, too, and it probably won't be long before it comes for the rest of the world. That's one of the headlines from Sandvine's Fall 2010 Global Internet Phenomena Report, an exhaustive look at what people around the world are doing with their Internet lines. According to Sandvine, Netflix accounts for 20 percent of downstream Internet traffic during peak home Internet usage hours in North America." more»

Network Neutrality and the FCC's Inability to Calibrate Regulation of Convergent Operators

For administrative convenience and not as required by law, the FCC likes to apply an either/or single regulatory classification to convergent operators. Having classified ISPs as information service providers, the Commission unsuccessfully sought to sanction Comcast's meddling with subscribers' peer-to-peer traffic. Now Chairman Genachowski wants to further narrow and nuance regulatory oversight without changing the organic information service classification. more»

Will Googlerola Be Able to Fight Data Caps?

"Is Google Turning Into a Mobile Phone Company?" asks the headline in Andrew Ross Sorkin's New York Times story. Wrong question, IMHO. But is Google doing the deal at least partly to give it leverage over wireless providers? I think so. The biggest threat to the growth of Smart Phones and tablets and other Google businesses like YouTube is the imposition of data caps and metered pricing by wireless providers like at&t and Verizon Wireless. more»

The Economist: American Cablecos Don't Want Customers to Cancel Contracts and Watch TV over Internet

The Economist discusses isses with providing Television over broadband: "In the land of free enterprise and the home of discount shopping, there can sometimes be an appalling lack of competition. High-speed access to the internet is one. Cable television is another. The reason is that in America cable-television companies, which provide a lot of the high-speed access, do not want their customers to cancel their contracts and watch television over the internet instead. Yet a growing number of people are poised to do just that. ... At your correspondent's home-from-home in Japan, he can get broadband at 160 megabits a second from his local cable company for Y6,000 ($60) a month. Compare that with broadband prices demanded by cable companies in America..." more»

No Free Lunch in Internet Peering or Transit

Like many of you, I am keenly following the Comcast-Level 3 dispute and am trying to make sense of it all. The dispute confirms several universal principles about Internet traffic routing that have passed the test of time. ... Consumers pay Internet Service Providers ("ISPs") a monthly subscription with the expectation that the fee covers access to available content, i.e., the conduit. As the World Wide Web evolves and content options diversify to include full motion video, consumers simply expect their ISPs to make sure the download distribution pipes are sufficiently robust to handle high bandwidth requirements and commensurately large monthly download volume. more»

Verizon: Voice is Dying

Ivan Seidenberg, Verizon CEO, saying "voice is dying" is a defining moment in telecom history. He didn't use those words, but his comments at Goldman Sachs are clear "we have to pivot and make a shift from the voice business to the data business and eventually to the video business. ... we must really position ourselves to be an extremely potent video-centric asset." more»

About Those "Mission Critical" Bits

News that Google and Verizon are negotiating "better than best efforts" Internet routing probably comes across as a betrayal of sorts to network neutrality advocates. Bear in mind that Information Service Providers ("ISPs") do not file public contracts known as tariffs and have the freedom to negotiate deals with individual clients. On the other hand ISPs, regardless of their FCC regulatory classification, cannot engage in unfair trade practices that achieve anticompetitive goals such a tilting the competitive playing field in favor of a corporate affiliate, or special third party. more»

Why Comcast will Vehemently Fight a DOJ Investigation

If your company becomes a huge dominate market player in both broadband and content delivery, scrutiny will come your way, like it or not. Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA) has been so successful in building both a content and delivery system to such a mass audience; it's beginning to look like former monopolies which grew unwanted investigations and break-ups in the 1980's. Remember AT&T and the DOJ anti-trust decision to split the monopoly into smaller regional companies? more»

IPTV on Steady Rise with More Views and Channels

The number of viewers watching TV piped into homes over the internet is increasing as more broadcasters look to offer their content this way.

Research out today reveals the number of people downloading television content or watching it live online is growing rapidly in the UK. According to findings from Continental Research, 5.4 per cent of the UK population have watched IPTV. In total, 3.6 per cent have watched streamed live content and 3.3 per cent have watched a program that they have downloaded. more»

Just How Big is China's Cable and TV market?

The numbers are big. Official figures quoted at the recent 21st annual China Content and Broadcasting Network (CCBN) conference indicate that China has 400 million TV households, of which 210 million subscribe to cable TV (CATV). Of these cable subscribers, 140 million receive digital service while the rest are still on analog systems. This means that the country's CATV network is still largely a one-way network, limiting the growth of on-demand and interactive services. more»

China's FttX Boom

China's broadband subscriber base continues to rise. Massive FttX deployments are underway, spurred on by competition between the three full-service operators all aiming to increase 'stickiness' for subscribers. While fixed line subscribers are expected to decline into 2011, broadband subscribers are still rising, driven by cheaper rates and the higher bandwidth on offer compared to mobile Internet. more»

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