IP Addressing

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IETF 85 Begins Next Week In Atlanta - Here Is How To Follow Along

The 85th meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) begins next week in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Over 1000 engineers, maybe as many as 1400 or more, from all around the world will gather in various working groups to discuss and debate issues relating to the open standards that define the Internet's infrastructure. more»

Business Case for IPv6 - Part 2

In my previous blog on the topic, I stated that the business case supporting the IPv4 roll-out in the late 90s was the Internet. Although IP depletion will slowly become a reality, the chances are that due to mitigating technologies such as NAT and DNS64, it may take quite a while before organizations in the developed economies will get serious about IPv6. So where should we look to find a business case for IPv6? more»

Measuring World IPv6 Day - First Impressions

The RIPE NCC took active measurements of World IPv6 Day participants before, during and after World IPv6 Day (in cooperation with CAIDA). We selected 53 participants and performed periodical A and AAAA DNS lookups and HTTP fetches from 40 servers worldwide. For HTTP, we fetched data over IPv4 and IPv6. These provide important control points... more»

IPv6: Circling the IPv4 Wagons for a Last Stand

The last remaining stocks disappear from the shelves more quickly than ever before . . . IPv4 addresses that is. As the ARIN met in Toronto in April, an inordinate amount of time was spent yet again debating proposals on how to handle the dwindling stock of IPv4 addresses. I get the distinct impression that some people will still be tabling proposals and discuss the issue long after the last IPv4 block has been allocated by IANA and even the RIR's themselves. more»

ARIN Statement on the Future of Addressing Policy

ARIN has just released a statement on the future of addressing policy. Specifically addressing the future of IPv4 addressing. What ARIN does is to emphasize the current policies and say they will be enforced even stronger than today if needed. I.e. there is no announcement of a change in policy. more»

Business Case for IPv6 - Part 1

When discussing IPv6, it is easy to forget that we are ultimately talking about an enhanced version of an existing network protocol. Sure, it brings about a number of technical advantages. But when viewed in isolation - without a business case - there really are not that many drivers that would place IPv6 on the agenda of the top decision makers looking after budgets. For IPv6 to gain serious momentum, this has to be changed. more»

IPv6 for Mobile Networks: Time to Act Now!

Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) serve the largest constituent of connected devices. There are over 4.6B GSM (and its derivatives) subscriptions today. When you add the CDMA family along with technologies with smaller footprints such as WiMax, IDEN to this list, that number tops 5B mark. On the other hand there are only (yes only!) 800M Internet hosts per ISC. Considering such a small percentage of those 5B or so devices are capable of being an Internet host and out of that percentage even a much smaller percentage is connected at a given time, one can understand the sheer potential of explosion in the number of Internet hosts as mobile devices in the next 3-5 years. more»

IPv6 Backwards Compatibility for IPv4 Most Critical Mistake, Developers Admit

In conjunction with the 74th IETF Meeting, on Tuesday Internet Society held a panel discussion on IPv6 adoption during which Internet engineering community pointed out that the biggest mistake in developing IPv6 is its lack of backwards compatibility with the existing Internet Protocol, IPv4. Reporting today on Network World, Carolyn Duffy Marsan writes: "...leaders of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) admitted that they didn't do a good enough job making sure native IPv6 devices and networks would be able to communicate with their IPv4-only counterparts when they designed the industry standard 13 years ago." ... "IPv6 proponents say the lack of mechanisms for bridging between IPv4 and IPv6 is the single, biggest reason that most ISPs and enterprises haven't deployed IPv6." more»

2008 Report Analyzing Distribution and Trends of IP Address Allocation

The study report analyzes the distribution and the trends of IP address allocation in 238 countries for 2007. From the data analysis (see Table 1 & Chart 1), the United States tops the allocation list by holding 37.73% of the IP addresses worldwide. It follows by United Kingdom (12.83%), Japan (7.64%), China (5.74%), Germany (3.81%), France (3.65%), Canada (2.81%), Korea (2.74%), Netherlands (2.00%) and Italy (1.67%). These Top 11 countries in the list occupied more than 80% of total allocated IP address ranges in the world in 2007. more»

ARIN Launches WHOWAS: Trial Service Providing Historical Information for a Given IP Address

American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) is running a trial service that gives users access to historical IP whois data – that is, it will tell you who was responsible for an IP address or block of IPs. The service is not automated and if you want to access it you will need to submit a request via email with information about not only what you want to know, but why you are interested in accessing the information. more»

Geoff Huston on Securing the Internet Routing System

Excerpts of a recent interview by Network World's Carolyn Duffy Marsan with Geoff Huston, one of the foremost authorities on Internet routing and scaling issues, has been published on the site. Questions include: "Can you explain in plain English what RPKI is trying to do and how it relates to improving the security of the Internet's routing system?" Huston's response follows... more»

Cloud Security Hinges on IP Addressing

In the first part of this trilogy, I discussed the importance of automatically provisioned second generation DNS in connection with Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Software Defined Data Centre (SDDC). In the second post, I talked about IP addressing, private enterprise networks, and how DHCP does not meet the requirements of multitenant Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud environments. I will now wrap up this trilogy by putting these two thesis into real-life context. more»

The Company You Keep

This story started earlier this year, with a posting to the Australian network operators' mailing list, asking if anyone had more information about why the web site that was operated by an outfit called "Melbourne Free University" was inaccessible through a number of major Australian ISPs. When they asked their local ISP if there was some issue, they were informed that "this was due to an Australian government request, and could say no more about it." more»

IPv4 Market Heats Up While Supply Dwindles

Doug Madory, Director of Internet Analysis at Dyn reports that while the available supply of IPv4 addresses is in sharp decline, the market for these virtual commodities is heating up. In recent months, the pace of the address transfers has greatly accelerated as evidenced by RIPE's table of IPv4 transfers, as well as the increasing number of IPv4 brokers facilitating the exchange of IPv4 address space. more»

First Broad Internet Census Since 1982 Reveals Surprising Number of Unused IPv4 Addresses

In the upcoming Internet Measurement Conference being held next week in Vouliagmeni, Greece, a team of six researchers will be presenting a paper called "Census and Survey of the Visible Internet," based on a comprehensive census of more 2.8 billion allocated IP addresses on the Internet. The research is claimed to be the first comprehensive census of its kind in more than two decades. more»