Cybercrime

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British Hacker Faces 60 Years in US Prison for Accessing Top-Secret Documents

Gary McKinnon, 42, from Enfield in north London, is accused by American prosecutors for illegally accessing top-secret US military and NASA computer systems -- called "the biggest military computer hack of all time" by prosecutors. Although the Crown Prosecution Service had decided not to prosecute, two years later, after crime unit officials visited Washington, apparently taking McKinnon's hard drive, the US government began extradition proceedings. "Now I'm facing 60 years in prison," McKinnon said. "I believe my case is being treated so seriously because they're scared of what I've seen. I'm living in a surreal, nutter's film." Updated 7/31/2008 more»

VeriSign Expands DNS Capacity From 400 Billion to Over 4 trillion Queries Per Day

Since 2000, the volume of Internet traffic on VeriSign's global infrastructure has increased from an average of 1 billion domain name system queries per day to a peak of more than 50 billion DNS queries per day under normal traffic conditions, reports VeriSign in a press release today. Under Project Titan, VeriSign reports it will increase its daily DNS query capacity from 400 billion queries a day to over 4 trillion queries a day and will increase the aggregate network bandwidth of its primary resolution centers around the world from more than 20 gigabits per second (Gbps) to greater than 200 Gbps per second. VeriSign also plans to expand its deployment of Regional Internet Resolution Sites to more than 100 locations across the globe by 2010. Plans also include deploying new proprietary security upgrades and monitoring tools to identify, track and isolate malicious Internet traffic generated from cyber attacks. more»

DHS Cybersecurity Chief: We Want to Build Cybersecurity Into DNA of Infrastructure

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's cybersecurity top official Phil Reitinger was recently interviewed by the InformationWeek stating: "Cybersecurity always has been and always will be a distributed effort. If people want to say, well, there's a single locus of cybersecurity and anything and everything will be handled from one point, I say, dream on. We want to build cybersecurity into the DNA of the infrastructure, into the DNA of the businesses, into the DNA of all the government entities." more»

The Big Bad Internet

I often think there are only two types of stories about the Internet. One is a continuing story of prodigious technology that continues to shrink in physical size and at the same time continue to dazzle and amaze us... The other is a darker evolving story of the associated vulnerabilities of this technology where we've seen "hacking" turn into organised crime and from there into a scale of sophistication that is sometimes termed "cyber warfare". And in this same darker theme one could add the current set of stories about various forms of state sponsored surveillance and espionage on the net. more»

Domain Name Arbitration Disputes on Rise

Internet domain name arbitration disputes have risen by more than a quarter since January 2005 -- despite the expansion of generic top-level domain addresses like .biz and .info -- as cybersquatters find more sophisticated ways of encroaching on legitimate Web sites.

...Typosquatting, a form of cybersquatting that involves capturing another company's Web traffic by registering misspelled versions of a well-known Internet site or brand name, is driving much of the growth in domain-name disputes, according to intellectual property lawyers. more»

Government and Private Sector Partnering for Cyberspace Security

Donald Kerr, principal deputy director of national intelligence, has proposed a radical new collaboration between government and the private sector in order to address "malicious activity in cyberspace [that] is a growing threat to everyone," according to a Washington Post report today. Kerr has offered some extensive solutions which include increasing government's involvement in developing technical products as well as... more»

Study Ranks Riskiest Online Cities in US

A recent study by Symantec Norton and Sperling's Best Places has ranked 50 cities in the United States by "Riskiest Online Cities". The study included investigation of a number of factors including... more»

U.S. Military Wants to Patrol the Internet

The U.S. military is looking for a contractor to patrol cyberspace, watching for warning signs of forthcoming terrorist attacks or other hostile activity on the Web. "If someone wants to blow us up, we want to know about it," Robert Hembrook, the deputy intelligence chief of the U.S. Army's Fifth Signal Command in Mannheim, Germany, told United Press International. "The purpose of the services will be to identify and assess stated and implied threat, antipathy, unrest and other contextual data relating to selected Internet domains," says the solicitation. more»

EC3, the European Cybercrime Centre, Opened - Challenges All Around

On Friday 11 January 2013 the European Cybercrime Centre, EC3, officially opened its doors at Europol in The Hague. If something shone through from the speeches of the panel participants, it is that there are tight budget restraints and a strong wish to cooperate with the U.S., the Interpol centre in Singapore and Russia. Let me share my thoughts on expectations. more»

Trojans Fastest Growing Category of Data-Stealing Malware

The Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG) recently reported that the number of sites infecting PCs with password-stealing crimeware reached an all time high of 31,173 in December 2008 - an 827 percent increase from January. And according to a report just released by Trend Micro's Focus Report, 93 percent of data-stealing malware have been identified as Trojans in the first quarter of 2009. more»

New Policy in China Favors Cybersquatters

New regulations will make it more difficult for companies to protect their domain names from cybersquatters in China.

Under the new rules, foreign and local firms will need to prove malicious intent and act quickly to have any hope of retrieving stolen domain names, according to a regulatory official interviewed by Chinese news site Sina. The new rules appear to give a green light to cybersquatters who buy up domain names which are similar to brand names in the hope of selling later for a profit. more»

Cybersecurity Rapidly Growing Part of U.S. Budget, Lockheed and Boeing Heavily Involved

Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co., the world's biggest defense companies, are deploying forces and resources to a new battlefield: cyberspace. The military contractors, eager to capture a share of a market that may reach $11 billion in 2013, have formed new business units to tap increased spending to protect U.S. government computers from attack. more»

Latvian Hosting Company Shut Down, Linked to World's Biggest Cybercrime Botnet

Swedish telco Telia Sonera has shut down the internet connections of Latvian company Real Host after it was linked with the world's biggest cybercrime botnet. Real Host has been compared to McColo and Atrivo, two hosting companies shut down by authorities because of links to large-scale cybercriminal activities. more»

Government Hacking: Proposed Law in the Netherlands

In 2012 I wrote a blog on CircleID called State hacking: Do's and don'ts, pros and cons. In this post I give some thoughts to the concept of a government "hacking back" at criminals. The reason for this was an announcement by the Dutch government that it contemplated law along these lines. The proposed law is now here: the Act Computer Criminality III. more»

China Not Only the World's Factory, but Also the World's Malware Factory

With China's economy cooling down, some of the country's IT professionals are turning to cybercrime, according to a Beijing-based security expert. Speaking at the CanSecWest security conference last week, Wei Zhao, CEO of Knownsec, a Beijing security company, said that while many Chinese workers may be feeling hard times, business is still booming in the country's cybercrime industry. "As the stock market dropped like a stone, a lot of IT professionals lost lots of money on the stock market," he said. "So sometimes they sell 0days," he said, referring to previously unknown software bugs. more»