Cyberattack / Most Viewed

EC3, the European Cybercrime Centre, Opened - Challenges All Around

On Friday 11 January 2013 the European Cybercrime Centre, EC3, officially opened its doors at Europol in The Hague. If something shone through from the speeches of the panel participants, it is that there are tight budget restraints and a strong wish to cooperate with the U.S., the Interpol centre in Singapore and Russia. Let me share my thoughts on expectations. more»

Best Practices for Implementing IPv6 and Avoiding Traffic Exposures

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the potential for IPv6 to create security issues. While there are definitely some security risks of IPv6 deployment, a carefully considered implementation plan can help mitigate against security risks. As we approach World IPv6 Launch tomorrow, I thought it prudent to share the below described incident that iDefense recently observed. more»

Botnets: Most Prevalent Threat on the Internet for the Enterprises

Based on the total number of transactions, Zscaler reports botnets as the biggest security risk on the Internet for the enterprises. "Once a host gets infected, the botnet usually spreads quickly within an enterprise. It also generates a significant amount of traffic to the command and control server, to download additional malware or perform other actions." more»

DNS Amplification Variant Expected in Future Major DDoS Attacks, Experts Warn

Several sources are reporting about a new form of denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks which are based on a new variant of DNS amplification. DNS amplification was first widely publicized in March of 2006 with the release of a paper by security experts Gadi Evron and Randal Vaughn which examined a scenario in which criminals abuse recursive DNS name servers by using spoofed user datagram protocol (UDP) packets. more»

China's CNCERT Response to Google

Gadi Evron writes: "China responds to Google's accusations on its CNCERT web site, here. Johannes Ullrich just brought this to my attention on Facebook. In short, CNCERT wrote that China is the biggest victim of cyber attacks, and that Google lacks evidence to link the recent attacks to China as the perpetrator. I am certain more details and analysis will become available soon." more»

Understanding the Threat Landscape: Indicators of Compromise (IOCs)

I previously provided a brief overview of how Verisign iDefense characterizes threat actors and their motivations through adversarial analysis. Not only do security professionals need to be aware of the kinds of actors they are up against, but they should also be aware of the tactical data fundamentals associated with cyber-attacks most commonly referred to as indicators of compromise (IOCs). Understanding the different types of tactical IOCs can allow for quick detection of a breach... more»

Vint Cerf on Internet's Key Infrastructure

BBC News is running Vint Cerf's personal view on the Internet's future. From the article: "Improving the resilience and resistance to attack of key infrastructure such as the Domain Name System (the phone book of the internet) and the routing system will be major focal points for near-term internet development. Introducing DNSSEC (security for the Domain Name System) and the digital signing of address space by the Regional Internet Registries will assume much higher priority..." more»

Chinese TV Footage Reveals Apparent Cyberattack on US Website

Reported in Guardian: "Footage that appears to feature army-labelled software raises questions about China's denials of involvement in hacking. China's state broadcaster has screened footage that apparently shows army-labelled software for attacking US-based websites, security experts have said. Beijing has consistently denied being behind cyber-attacks, insisting it plays no part in hacking and is itself a victim." more»

Tackling Cyber Security: Should We Trust the Libertarians? Part 2

A couple of months ago, I wrote a post posing the question of whether or not more government regulation is required in order to secure the Internet. On the one hand, anonymity is viewed in the west as a forum for freedom of speech. The anonymity of the Internet allows dissidents to speak up against unpopular governments. However, the anonymity afforded by the Internet is not so much by design as it is byproduct of its original designers not seeing how widespread it would eventually become. more»

NYT: Atomic Bomb Changed Warfare 64 Years Ago, International Race Has Begun to Develop Cyberweapons

When American forces in Iraq wanted to lure members of Al Qaeda into a trap, they hacked into one of the group's computers and altered information that drove them into American gun sights. When President George W. Bush ordered new ways to slow Iran's progress toward a nuclear bomb last year, he approved a plan for an experimental covert program -- its results still unclear -- to bore into their computers and undermine the project... more»

Nitro Attacks Target the Chemical Industry

New security report has revealed at least 48 companies involved in research, development, manufacturing of chemicals and advanced materials have been victims of a coordinated cyberattack traced to a source in China. The purpose of the attacks, code named Nitro, appear to be industrial espionage, collecting intellectual property for competitive advantage, according to Symantec. more»

Botnets Now Number One Threat to ISP Backbones

Increasingly-intense distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attacks on ISP backbones are surpassing providers' capacity and knocking customers offline, according to a new survey of service providers by Arbor Networks. While most large ISPs have upgraded their backbones to 10-Gbit/s speeds over the past two years, three respondents said they have experienced sustained attacks from 20- to 22 Gbit/s, and one hosting services provider in the survey reported a 24-Gbit/s DNS-targeted attack. The most powerful sustained attack previously was 17 Gbit/s, which was reported in last year's survey by Arbor. more»

IT Security Guide: "Financial Impact of Cyber Risk" Released by ANSI and ISA

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the Internet Security Alliance (ISA) released today a new action guide to assist business executives in the analysis, management and transfer of financial risk related to a cyber attack. In 2004, the Congressional Research Service estimated the annual economic impact of cyber attacks on businesses -- which can come from internal networks, the Internet or other private or public systems -- to be more than $226 billion. In 2008, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff named cyber risks one of the nation's top four priority security issues. more»

New Research Reveals 56% Rise in Cost of Cybercrime

New research indicates cyberattacks increasingly plague businesses and government organizations, resulting in significant financial impact, despite widespread awareness. Conducted by the Ponemon Institute, the Second Annual Cost of Cyber Crime Study revealed that the median annualized cost of cybercrime incurred by a benchmark sample of organizations was $5.9 million per year, with a range of $1.5 million to $36.5 million each year per organization. This represents an increase of 56 percent from the median cost reported in the inaugural study published in July 2010. more»

US Department of Transportation Seeking Help for Motor Vehicle Cybersecurity Safeguards

The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) and Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), today released a Request for Information (RFI) seeking to obtain informed views on the "perceived needs, prevailing practices, and lessons learned concerning the cybersecurity and safety of safety-critical electronic control systems used in various modes of transportation and other industry sectors."