Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing / Recently Commented

The Ultimate Differentiator: Reliability!

Every company that monitors their site or application performance focuses on two key metrics Availability and Speed. However, there is a third metric, Reliability, which is often misunderstood or in some cases ignored by companies. Reliability measures availability, accuracy, and delivery of a service within a time threshold. Reliability is difficult to define and measure as it is different for each company and service. To simplify it, you can think of Reliability as how consistent are you in delivering the "service". more»

Cloud Consortium Releases Security Compliance Tools

Mathew J. Schwartz reporting in InformationWeek: "The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) on Wednesday announced the release of a new governance, risk management, and compliance stack for cloud computing. The suite of cloud security tools, available for free download, is meant to help organizations create public and private clouds that comply with industry standards for accepted governance, risk, and compliance (GRC) best practices." more»

Clouded by a Convenient Illusion

In a relatively short time, the phrase "in the cloud" has become a term of art when talking about the internet. A quick Google search shows nearly a million uses of the phrase in the past month, a 3x increase from the same period in 2009. But, what does it actually mean to have your web site, your software, your data, or anything else "in the cloud?" "In the cloud" is derived from "cloud computing," which in turn is just a new term for distributed computing, where data-crunching tasks are spread across a variety of different physical processing units. This was common in mainframes in the 1960s, and later the idea of distributing processing across cheap PCs running Linux became popular in the 1990s. more»

Native Web Applications (NWA) vs. Rich Internet Applications (RIA)

A rewrite of the Rich Internet Application (RIA) article is my latest contribution to Wikipedia following last year's full rewrite of the Cloud Computing article (which is now finally fairly stable and one of the main authoritative sources on the topic; according to the article statistics I've just done my 500th edit, or one every eight hours on average so it's about as up-to-date as you'll find). Needless to say I agree wholeheartedly with Mozilla's Mark Finkle in saying RIA is Dead! Long Live Web Applications... more»

Infrastructures on the Next Web

Werner Vogels, CTO of Amazon, explains how web applications will be built in the future. His point is twofold. The bad news is that expectations for good web applications are sky high. It has to have rich media, available on multiple devices, very scalable, social networking and that is just the beginning. The good news is that a lot of this can be done by services that are readily available on the web, with reasonable usage based pricing. more»

Live Long and (Do Not) Prosper: Lessons and Reminders from Yesterday's Wikipedia Outage

Yesterday's Wikipedia outage, which resulted from invalid DNS zone information, provides some good reminders about the best and worst attributes of active DNS management. The best part of the DNS is that it provides knowledgeable operators with a great tool to use to manage traffic around trouble spots on a network. In this case, Wikipedia was attempting to route around its European data center because... more»

Could This Be the Silver Bullet for Cloud Computing

This article on cloud appeared in the Economist.com on April 12th 2001 titled "The Beast of Complexities" Stuart Feldman of IBM, mentions these examples. Quote 'Picture yourself as the product manager of a new hand-held computer whose design team has just sent him the electronic blueprint for the device. You go to your personalized web portal and order the components, book manufacturing capacity and arrange for distribution. With the click of a mouse, you create an instant supply chain that, once the job is done, will dissolve again." unquote. ...In the same article he also lamented that so far, nobody has found a silver bullet to kill the Beast of Complexity. more»

Vint Cerf Stresses the Need for Inter-Cloud Standards

Vint Cerf in a recent talk has compared the current cloud situation to the lack of communication and familiarity that existed among computer networks in 1973. "At some point, it makes sense for somebody to say, 'I want to move my data from cloud A to cloud B,'" but the different clouds do not know each other, he said. "We don't have any inter-cloud standards," Cerf said. They might even want to have multiple clouds interact with each other in order to take advantage of the computing power offered through such combinations, he said. more»

Cloud Computing Types: Public Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, Private Cloud

It's no secret that I don't very much like this whole private cloud or internal cloud concept... on the basis that while advanced virtualisation technologies are valuable to businesses they are a severe short sell of what cloud computing is ultimately capable of. The electricity grid took over from the on-site generators very quickly and I expect cloud computing to do the same with respect to private servers, racks and datacenters... more»

Email Snooping Can Be Intrusion Upon Seclusion

Analysis could also affect liability of enterprises using cloud computing technologies... Local elected official Steinbach had an email account that was issued by the municipality. Third party Hostway provided the technology for the account. Steinbach logged in to her Hostway webmail account and noticed eleven messages from constituents had been forwarded by someone else to her political rival. more»

The Browser Is the OS (Thanks to Firefox 3.5, Chrome 2, Safari 4)

Almost a year ago I wrote about Google Chrome: Cloud Operating Environment and [re]wrote the Google Chrome Wikipedia article, discussing the ways in which Google was changing the game through new and innovative features... Similar features were quickly adopted by competitors including Opera (which Chrome quickly overtook at ~2%) and Firefox (which still has an order of magnitude more users at ~20-25%). more»

GNU Founder Richard Stallman Warns Against Cloud Computing

Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation and creator of the computer operating system GNU, says cloud computing is essentially a trap that will eventually pressure more people into buying locked, proprietary systems that will continue to cost them more over time. "It's stupidity. It's worse than stupidity: it's a marketing hype campaign," says Stallman. Bobbie Johnson, Guardian's technology correspondent says 'his comments echo those made last week by Larry Ellison, the founder of Oracle, who criticized the rash of cloud computing announcements as "fashion-driven" and "complete gibberish".' more»

Cloud Computing and Privacy

There has been a good deal of talk of late on the important topic of security and privacy in relation to cloud computing. Indeed there are some legitimate concerns and some work that needs to be done in this area in general, but I'm going to focus today on the latter term (indeed they are distinct -- as a CISSP security is my forte but I will talk more on this separately). more»

The SocialDNS Project… and Why DNS is Not the Phone Book of the Internet

In this article I will explain the motivations behind the SocialDNS Project. I will justify why the DNS system is NOT the phone book of the Internet. More concretely, DNS is not a public directory nor enables search mechanisms over meta-information related to domains. In this line, I will present the advantages of SocialDNS, a naming and directory system that aims to become the phone book of the Web. SocialDNS is NOT another alternative DNS root nor aims to replace the current DNS for resolving domain names. It complements the existing DNS to offer advanced services that are beyond the scope of the existing infrastructure for Web settings. more»

Mix It Up: Key Ingredients of Successful Cloud Management Systems

The cloud cuts both ways; while the ability to spin up compute power on demand has empowered even small businesses to compete on a global scale, this same flexibility has led to a significant amount of "cloud sprawl." According to Tech Radar, 61 percent of companies surveyed said cloud sprawl - both from employees using unauthorized services and not fully utilizing approved resources - is responsible for business-wide inefficiencies. Bottom line? more»