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Sensitive US Government Data Leaked Via P2P Networks

Brian Krebs in the Washington Post reports: "The latest caches of sensitive data reportedly found on peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing networks are shocking: A highly sensitive document dated July 2009, listing the precise location of installations bearing weapons grade nuclear fuel in the United States; FBI surveillance photos of an alleged mafia hit man leaked while he was still on trial, along with the the government's witness list, some of whom are in the government's witness protection program; A U.S. Secret Service document on the location and layout of an emergency safe house for First Lady Michelle Obama. The revelations came at a House Government Oversight & Government Reform Committee hearing on the problem of inadvertent sharing of files via P2P software."

Read full story: Washington Post

Related topics: P2P, Security

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Comments

If this is a single, isolated incident, Chr1s Shea7s  –  Jul 29, 2009 3:20 PM PST

If this is a single, isolated incident, this is quite scary. The reported information that has been leaked this time is rather erratic. Why does this one document contain such inconsistent information? That in itself is a slippery slope because a security-minded organization would hopefully disperse these different kinds of information in different places requiring different forms of authentication to access said information. Unless, of course, it was released intentionally, to cause a media uproar and have legislation pushed a certain way.  The article doesn’t actually say how this one document was released, only that it is there now. I agree that P2P applications should be heavily regulated on secure networks; however, putting “a referee on the field” could mean so many things. Why would this matter extend beyond government organizations? Why should this one instance propagate the need to involve the FTC and the FCC? There’s certainly a lot more going on here than just digitalized information being released on the Internet. Are they trying to force mandates on how information is shared over the Internet, in general? It’s absurd that their primary notion is that P2P infrastructure condones “unfair trade practice.”This seems to be a black and white instance of politicians scaring people into voting a certain way. And for what the article is certainly most unclear about.

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