U.S. Lawmakers Wary of Kaspersky Lab, the Russian Cybersecurity Firm

By CircleID Reporter

U.S. Congress is growing increasingly suspicious of the popular Russian anti-virus software provider, Kaspersky Lab. Western corporations such as Best Buy, load laptop computers with Kaspersky Lab software before selling them and according to NPR, the Federal Bureau of Prisons uses the company's products as well as many state and local government entities. NPR reports: "[S]hould legislation recently approved by both the House and Senate Armed Services Committees become law, the U.S. military would be barred from owning or using any products made by Kaspersky. But should legislation recently approved by both the House and Senate Armed Services Committees become law, the U.S. military would be barred from owning or using any products made by Kaspersky." According to other news reports, Eugene Kaspersky, company founder, and chief executive has denied any ties to the Kremlin and offered to have company's source code examined by U.S. government officials.

Related topics: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Law, Policy & Regulation

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