The Future of Religions on the Internet

By Shahram Soboutipour
Shahram Soboutipour

A statistical approach to the ICANN new gTLD program

Internet is facing the biggest change in its history. New brands, ideas, groups, communities,… have now found the chance to apply for their own specific space on internet naming system through ICANN's new gTLD program.

One of the most interesting points of this courageous program was the motivation it created among communities to try to represent their specific webspace on the internet by applying for their own TLD; and among them were the religious communities as well.

Regardless of the major questions of "who the applicants are?" and "whether they have the competency to hold a religious TLD or not?", the fact that religious communities are interested in presence on the internet made me curious about the position of the religious TLDs against each other in the future of internet, so I did a statistical investigation on the current new gTLD applications.

The results were interesting.

Among all 1930 applications, I found 17 applications related to religious concepts (please comment if I have missed something):

Comments

.UMMAH is not subsidiary of Islam Katim S. Touray  –  Jan 22, 2013 7:11 PM PDT

Shahram, .UMMAH is not a subsidiary of Islam, as you wrongly have it categorized in your article.  .UMMAH is a TLD aimed at the global Islamic community (Ummah), and all aiming to reach that community.  It is not aimed at, nor is, any particular Islamic sect such as Sunni or Shia. Other than that, yours is an informative and interesting article.  Thanks!

Katim, you are right, but my categorization Shahram Soboutipour  –  Jan 22, 2013 11:43 PM PDT

Katim, you are right, but my categorization on the main religious TLDs here means those names which exactly present the name of the religion or their main holly book. Besides "Ummah” is not commonly used between some sects (e.g. between Shia's).
I think the important fact about these statistics is that it shows that the Christians have been more active (or maybe better informed) in the new gTLD program.