ICANN's New TLDs: Of Course There Will Be an Auction - Part 2

By John Levine
John Levine

A few days ago I opined that if several people want the same Top-Level Domain (TLD) and can't come to terms otherwise, they should arrange a private auction. It would be an odd sort of auction, since the buyers and sellers are the same people, so unlike normal auctions, the goal is not to maximize the selling price. How might it work?

We have several applicants, call the number N, and an auctioneer. The auctioneer is disinterested, that is, not related to any of the bidders, and has no stake in the outcome. Since the goal of the auction is to persuade all but one of the bidders to drop out, there's no need for more than one round. Each of the applicants figures out what amount it would take to persuade him to drop out, the highest amount wins, and the losers all get their drop out price.

So assuming that all of the applicants have agreed to participate in this auction:

Unlike a regular auction, there is no rule against bidders colluding. If several of the bidders want to agree to bid the same, or preferably one bids $1 more to avoid having to fire up the Lavarnd, go ahead. The auctioneer keeps the bids secret until they've all arrived, but if any of the bidders wants to tell the others what he's bid, that's OK, too. Of course, he might be lying.

The hardest part to figure out here is how to work this in the context of the ICANN application process. The sooner the losers withdraw their applications, the more of their $185,000 application fee they get back. On the other hand, if they withdraw them before ICANN has agreed to delegate the domain to the winner, it's possible that there will be an unexpected objection either to the applicant (ICANN decides he's a domain squatter, perhaps), or to the string (the GAC decides it's a dirty word.) I don't have a great answer for this beyond all of the bidders agreeing in advance both when the losing applications are cancelled, and when the money is paid out. If the winning bidder is disqualified before the others are cancelled, then it's straightforward to give the former winner his money back and re-score the auction with the remaining bidders to pick a new winner. If it's after that, well, oops.

By John Levine, Author, Consultant & Speaker. Visit the blog maintained by John Levine here.

Related topics: ICANN, Policy & Regulation, New TLDs

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