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China Adds Chinese Top-Level Domain Names

China's Ministry of Information Industry (MII) has made adjustment to China's Internet domain name system in accordance with Article 6 of China Internet Domain Names Regulations.

After the adjustment, ".MIL" will be added under the top-level domain (TLD) name of "CN". A new Internet domain name system will take effect as of March 1 in China. Under the new system, besides "CN", three Chinese TLD names "CN", "COM" and "NET" are temporarily set. more

IANA Up For Grabs?

The US government wants to hear from organizations interested in running some of the internet's key resources, including the master lists of IP address space and domain names.

The Department of Commerce last week published a request for information, a step before potentially putting a contract out to bidding, soliciting interest from anybody interested in taking over the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. more

Revised ICANN, VeriSign Deal Still Uncertain

ICANN board members met this week about the revised deal with VeriSign for control of the .com registry. The revised deal would end all pending litigation between ICANN and VeriSign, as well as allow VeriSign to raise domain prices and continue to manage the registry for "near perpetuity." ..."ICANN's next regular meeting is at the end of March in New Zealand, and it seems incredulous that they wouldn't use that already-fixed date for a public meeting as the next legitimate time to discuss this." more

VeriSign's Chief Hits Back at .com Critics

VeriSign's chief executive Stratton Sclavos has urged ICANN to quickly approve a deal that would allow the company to raise the price of .com domains, saying those who oppose it are acting out of "narrow economic interests".

The demand, in a letter published yesterday [PDF], came as opposition mounted to the proposal. Those criticizing the deal now include a former ICANN chief executive, and ICANN's At Large Advisory Committee, which represents end users. more

SIP Emerges as De Facto VoIP Standard

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is emerging as the de facto corporate standard for VoIP networks running converged voice/data communications, industry experts reported today.

Analyst firm Frost & Sullivan said that SIP is anticipated to "replace the traditional modes of communication, and create an alternative communication industry reducing network elements to mere call-forwarding devices". more

Consultation for the Creation of Internet Governance Forum Has Concluded

Governments, business, academia and civil society have reached an uneasy truce at the end of two days of meetings over the creation of a new global body for the Internet.

There remain a number of large issues to be agreed but, thanks to some heavy prodding by UN special adviser Nitin Desai, enough agreement was reached for a first report to be sent to UN secretary-general Kofi Annan. more

Opposition to ICANN-VeriSign Proposal Grows

Eight of the world's largest domain registrars have sent an open letter to ICANN Chairman Vint Cerf, stating their formal opposition to the revised proposition with VeriSign for continued control of the Internet registry.

The eight signatories, which lay claim to 25 million domain names, or 57 percent of those currently registered, are GoDaddy, Network Solutions, Tucows, Register.com, BulkRegister, Schlund + Partner AG, Melbourne IT and Intercosmos Media Group.
 more

EU To Compete with Dot-Com

There has been a flurry of activity among businesses and other domain-name holders in Europe following Tuesday's launch of the new ".eu" Internet domain by the European Union.

As of Thursday morning, some 270,000 applications for 198,000 different names using the new .eu tag had been received by the European Registry of Internet Domain Names (Eurid), which is authorized by the EU to operate the .eu registry, according to organization spokesperson Patrik Linden. more

Effects of Domain Hijacking Can Linger

Malicious hackers who are able to hijack an organization's Web domain may be able to steal traffic from the legitimate Web site long after the domain has been restored to its owner, according to a recent report.

Design flaws in the way Web browsers and proxy servers store data about Web sites allow malicious hackers to continue directing Web surfers to malicious Web pages for days or even months after the initial domain hijacking. more

Rapid IPv6 Deployment Not Warranted Says U.S. Government

IPv6 advocates looking for the U.S. federal government to make a major financial commitment to the next generation of the Internet's main communications protocol will be disappointed with the findings of a new report from the Department of Commerce.

"Aggressive government action to accelerate the deployment of IPv6 by the private sector is not warranted at this time," according to the Commerce Department's IPv6 Task Force, which consists of officials from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. more

New Policy in China Favors Cybersquatters

New regulations will make it more difficult for companies to protect their domain names from cybersquatters in China.

Under the new rules, foreign and local firms will need to prove malicious intent and act quickly to have any hope of retrieving stolen domain names, according to a regulatory official interviewed by Chinese news site Sina. The new rules appear to give a green light to cybersquatters who buy up domain names which are similar to brand names in the hope of selling later for a profit. more

U.S. Congress Pushing for Adult Top-Level Domain

It's rare that Christian conservatives and the pornography industry agree on anything. But a congressional proposal to create a new Internet domain has made odd bedfellows of the two groups.

Some moderate Democrats in Congress are pushing for an Internet red-light district where pornography would be isolated on an ''.xxx'' domain. Conservatives and the adult entertainment industry are fighting the idea -- but for dramatically different reasons. more

Postage is Due for Companies Sending Email

Companies will soon have to buy the electronic equivalent of a postage stamp if they want to be certain that their e-mail will be delivered to many of their customers. America Online and Yahoo, two of the world's largest providers of e-mail accounts, are about to start using a controversial system that gives preferential treatment to messages from companies that pay from 1/4 of a cent to a penny each to have them delivered. The senders must contact only people who have agreed to receive their messages, or risk being blocked entirely. more

ICANN Releases New .Com Contract

Internet overseeing body ICANN has released a revised contract for all dotcoms which it hopes will finally end a huge legal fight at the heart of the Internet.

Significant changes have been made to the deal - which will hand control of all dotcom domains to current owner VeriSign until 2012 - following widespread criticism from the Internet industry. more

Microsoft Leverages IPv6 With Vista

Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6) promises to deliver connectivity features in Windows Vista not possible with today's Internet protocol version 4 (IPv4).

Sinead O'Donovan, product unit manger for networking at Microsoft, said "When we looked at key applications such as MSN Messenger, we learned that developers needed to do too many tricks to get them to work over NAT." more

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