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EU To Compete with Dot-Com

There has been a flurry of activity among businesses and other domain-name holders in Europe following Tuesday's launch of the new ".eu" Internet domain by the European Union.

As of Thursday morning, some 270,000 applications for 198,000 different names using the new .eu tag had been received by the European Registry of Internet Domain Names (Eurid), which is authorized by the EU to operate the .eu registry, according to organization spokesperson Patrik Linden. more

Effects of Domain Hijacking Can Linger

Malicious hackers who are able to hijack an organization's Web domain may be able to steal traffic from the legitimate Web site long after the domain has been restored to its owner, according to a recent report.

Design flaws in the way Web browsers and proxy servers store data about Web sites allow malicious hackers to continue directing Web surfers to malicious Web pages for days or even months after the initial domain hijacking. more

Rapid IPv6 Deployment Not Warranted Says U.S. Government

IPv6 advocates looking for the U.S. federal government to make a major financial commitment to the next generation of the Internet's main communications protocol will be disappointed with the findings of a new report from the Department of Commerce.

"Aggressive government action to accelerate the deployment of IPv6 by the private sector is not warranted at this time," according to the Commerce Department's IPv6 Task Force, which consists of officials from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. more

New Policy in China Favors Cybersquatters

New regulations will make it more difficult for companies to protect their domain names from cybersquatters in China.

Under the new rules, foreign and local firms will need to prove malicious intent and act quickly to have any hope of retrieving stolen domain names, according to a regulatory official interviewed by Chinese news site Sina. The new rules appear to give a green light to cybersquatters who buy up domain names which are similar to brand names in the hope of selling later for a profit. more

U.S. Congress Pushing for Adult Top-Level Domain

It's rare that Christian conservatives and the pornography industry agree on anything. But a congressional proposal to create a new Internet domain has made odd bedfellows of the two groups.

Some moderate Democrats in Congress are pushing for an Internet red-light district where pornography would be isolated on an ''.xxx'' domain. Conservatives and the adult entertainment industry are fighting the idea -- but for dramatically different reasons. more

Postage is Due for Companies Sending Email

Companies will soon have to buy the electronic equivalent of a postage stamp if they want to be certain that their e-mail will be delivered to many of their customers. America Online and Yahoo, two of the world's largest providers of e-mail accounts, are about to start using a controversial system that gives preferential treatment to messages from companies that pay from 1/4 of a cent to a penny each to have them delivered. The senders must contact only people who have agreed to receive their messages, or risk being blocked entirely. more

ICANN Releases New .Com Contract

Internet overseeing body ICANN has released a revised contract for all dotcoms which it hopes will finally end a huge legal fight at the heart of the Internet.

Significant changes have been made to the deal - which will hand control of all dotcom domains to current owner VeriSign until 2012 - following widespread criticism from the Internet industry. more

Microsoft Leverages IPv6 With Vista

Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6) promises to deliver connectivity features in Windows Vista not possible with today's Internet protocol version 4 (IPv4).

Sinead O'Donovan, product unit manger for networking at Microsoft, said "When we looked at key applications such as MSN Messenger, we learned that developers needed to do too many tricks to get them to work over NAT." more

Skype Affiliate Can Keep Skyp.com, Says WIPO

Crucially, Benjamin Decraene of Belgium registered the name before Skype had launched and long before eBay paid $2.6 billion for the company. Skype.com was registered in April 2003 and its net telephony service began four months later; but Decraene registered Skyp.com in May 2002.

Skype asked the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) to remove the name from Decraene, who accepted that the names were confusingly similar. But Skype struggled to show that Decraene had no right to keep the name. more

Domain Names for Newborns Becoming a Trend

Luke Seeley, 22 months, has two Web sites of his own, including lukeseeley.com, a domain his father purchased soon after an ultrasound showed that his first child was a boy, four months before the baby was born.

"It's like owning a piece of real estate online for him," said Seeley, 34, who lives in Vancouver, Wash., and specializes in Internet sales for an advertising firm. "By the time he's a teenager and he's really into the Internet, who knows what's going to be left in terms of domains?"  more

Sex.com Sold for $14m

The infamous and controversial domain Sex.com has officially been sold to Boston-based Escom LLC for a reported $14 million, as reported by XBiz.

Prior to learning of the sale of Sex.com, numerous adult industry message board postings had already begun speculating on the sale after noticing the radical change in the appearance of the Sex.com website. On the homepage of the updated website, the new owners refer to the site as "the new Sex.com," and the appearance is radically different from the former site. The site is copyrighted by Escom.  more

Internet's Universality Faces Threat

More than a decade after the Internet became available for commercial use, other countries and organizations are erecting rivals to it -- raising fears that global interconnectivity will be diminished.

German computer engineers are building an alternative to the Internet to make a political statement. A Dutch company has built one to make money. China has created three suffixes in Chinese characters substituting for .com and the like, resulting in Web sites and email addresses inaccessible to users outside of China. The 22-nation Arab League has begun a similar system using Arabic suffixes.

"The Internet is no longer the kind of thing where only six guys in the world can build it," says Paul Vixie, 42 years old, a key architect of the U.S.-supported Internet. "Now, you can write a couple of checks and get one of your own." To bring attention to the deepening fault lines, Mr. Vixie recently joined the German group's effort.

Full text also available here. more

IETF is 20 Today

From a notorious striptease by Internet pioneer Vint Cerf to a fist-pumping, table-jumping brawl about cryptography policy, the Internet's premier standards-setting body has had its share of big moments. This week, the IETF celebrates another one when it turns 20. The IETF is an egalitarian, all-volunteer group consisting of network engineers from Cisco, IBM, Microsoft, AT&T and other leading vendors. It has created many of the underlying standards that make the Internet work, including fundamental routing, e-mail, directory services and telephony protocols. more

China's .CN Domain Name Registrations Top 1 Million

The number of registered .cn domain names has topped 1 million for the first time, according to the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC), which oversees the administration of the top-level domain for China.

At the end of December, nearly 1.1 million domain names had been registered under the .cn top-level domain, CNNIC said in a statement. That represents an annual increase of 154 percent and makes the .cn top-level domain the largest in Asia and the sixth-largest in the world, it said. more

UN to Take First Step Towards the New Internet Governance Forum

The United Nations will launch the first round of consultations next month on creating a new Internet governance body [IGF], as agreed by delegates attending the global Net summit in Tunis last year.

The U.N., which hosted the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in November, is welcoming all stakeholders to attend the consultations, which will take place in Geneva on Feb. 16-17, according to a statement published Jan. 11 by Swiss diplomat Markus Kummer, who had previously participated in the WSIS Working Group on Internet Governance. more

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